Recipe: Our Labor Day Menu

Shrimp Labor Day: for many of us, it's the last hurrah of summer. We've got recipes that will help make the best of the long weekend. Mint Julep – The Kentucky Derby is long over, but JBF Award winners Matt Lee and Ted Lee's recipe for this classic Southern cocktail is a great way to cool off all summer. Vegetables a la Grecque – James Beard's solution to late summer's "bounty of glistening vegetables," this simple recipe can be made in advance. Barbecued Shrimp with Pineapple Chutney – Chutney adds an unexpected burst of flavor to this grilled seafood dish.

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The Bookshelf: Andrew Coe

Chop SueyIf you find connections between eating and culture fascinating, take note: Andrew Coe, who has written for Saveur, Gastronomica, and the New York Times, has published Chop Suey: A Cultural History of Chinese Food in the United States. With over 40,000 Chinese restaurants in the country, many Americans take this food (or, rather, its Americanized versions and offshoots) for granted. But with a timeline that includes violence, late 19th-century Bohemia, and modern political diplomacy, Chop Suey exposes the cuisine’s extraordinary development in the West. A Brooklyn resident and frequent patron of New York’s Chinese eateries, Coe is the Chinese food lover’s compass. Even though his motto is “Eat now, talk later,” he took a moment to tell us about his favorite spots in the

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Eye Candy: Beard House

Strawberry soup Pastry chef Jennifer Yee of Aureole served this cold strawberry soup at the Beard House last Tuesday. To keep the sweetness in check, she included a scoop of tangy queso fresco ice cream and a teetering slab of ancho meringue. Take a look at more pictures from the meal, which also featured the cooking of JBF Award winner Chris Lee, Jason Dady, and Daniel Patino. August 25, 2009, The Beard House, NYC (Photo by Erin Gleeson)

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Recipe: Pavlova

Pavlova Last night Australian chef Adrian Richardson served this light and sweet pavlova at the Beard House. Delightful in its textural contrast—a bite into the crunchy exterior exposes a gooey center that mimics marshmallow—the dessert is a joy to eat. Richardson tops his with mascarpone and passion fruit, but any light fruit will do.

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Jobs We Love: Brian Halweil

Brian Halweil As the editor of Edible East End and publisher of Edible Brooklyn and Edible Manhattan, Brian Halweil wears many hats. He took a break from tackling his inbox to give some advice to writers and explain how daily meals help him do business.

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Eat this Word: Pavlova

PavlovaWHAT? Dancer's dessert. Named for the world-famous Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova, this fruit, whipped cream, and meringue dessert is claimed by rival nations. Aussies have long considered it their national dessert, but New Zealanders argue that they invented the Pavlova, and they back up their claim with citations from cookbooks. The dancer toured both countries in the late 1920s. In Perth, Australia, she stayed at the Esplanade Hotel, whose chef, Herbert Sachse, is often credited with creating the dessert some six years later. Supposedly the Pavlova acquired its name after someone proclaimed his dessert was "as light as Pavlova." Others think the name stems from the fact that the ring-shaped meringue resembled Pavlova's frilly, white costume in her most famous role, the Dying Swan. Pavlovas—which are showing up on American tables of late—are traditionally filled with passion fruit. WHERE?

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Eye Candy: Greenhouse Gallery

Michael Harlan Turkell Our next exhibit in the Greenhouse Gallery opens today, featuring the candid photography of Michael Harlan Turkell. Once an aspiring chef, Turkell now documents the choreography of restaurant kitchens, highlighting the fascinating coexistence of order and chaos that often remains out of the diner's view. His award-winning photography has appeared in Saveur, Edible Brooklyn, Edible Manhattan, and New York magazine, among others. He has also photographed a number of dinners at the Beard House (click here and here to see some of his work for us). Turkell's images will be on view through the end of October

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