Champagne Lovers' Menu

 

Planning a celebratory New Year's Eve dinner? You'll really be cooking with gas with this decadent menu composed entirely of dishes made with bubbly.

 

Champagne Jelly with Golden Raspberries and Mint

This delicate, palate-awakening hors d'oeuvre is the perfect starter for an elegant, Champers-themed meal.

 

Warm Oysters with Prosecco, Cauliflower, and Sorrel Soup

Chef Ethan Stowell makes this creamy, oyster-topped soup with Prosecco, but Champagne makes a luxurious substitute.

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Edward Behr on How to Eat Better in 2014

Edward Behr on How to Eat Better in 2014

 

In his new cookbook, 50 Foods: The Essentials of Good Taste, noted culinary expert Edward Behr guides readers on how to select, prepare, and most importantly, enjoy, some of the world’s best foods. To help us get the new year started off right, here are Behr’s top ten tips for a delicious 2014. — JBF Editors

 

1. Eat better apples.

Most of the apples in supermarkets have been picked too soon, and even if they were stored well, they’ve spent too long in the distribution pipeline and then sat too long in displays without refrigeration. They’re not at their best. Instead go to a farmers’ market or a store that cares about fruit and offers great varieties with real flavor, such as Ashmead’s Kernel, Duchess of Oldenburg, Esopus Spitzenburg, Newtown Pippin, Wickson Crab, Pink Pearl, and Macoun (the best of the McIntosh family). Any of those are good for eating out of hand and are also excellent for cooking.

 

2. Eat fresher,

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The Bookshelf: What’s a Hostess to Do?

What’s a Hostess to Do? by Susan Spungen (Artisan Books, 2013)

 

Want to entertain flawlessly? So do we, so we enlisted recipe developer, food stylist, and author Susan Spungen to share five tips from her new book, What’s a Hostess to Do?, an invaluable resource chock-full of guidance, recipes, and helpful illustrations to help you become a party-throwing pro.—JBF Editors

 

 

Make It Ahead

Unless you’re a very confident cook, avoid last-minute cooking at all costs. A frantic or absent chef does not put guests at ease. For many of us, salads and stews are saviors.

 

Cook What You Know

The day of your party is not the time to practice something fancy that you’ve never even tasted, let alone cooked. Your tried-and-true pot roast may not seem exciting to you, but a solid dish done well is always better than a flashy one gone awry.

 

Think Like a Chef

Putting all of your ingredients in place... Read more >

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On the Menu: Week of December 29

Upcoming events at the James Beard Foundation

 

Here's what's on the Beard House calendar next week:

 

Tuesday, December 31, 9:00 P.M.

New Year’s Eve Celebration

Ring in 2014 with good cheer and incredible food at our annual New Year’s Eve celebration. The teams from the International Culinary School at the Art Institute have planned an extravagant menu that is sure to make this year’s fête our most festive yet.

 

Thursday, January 2, to Friday, February 28, 10:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.

Greenhouse Gallery

Cheryl Brock

Before 

Cheryl Brock's artwork is built upon intensely patient observations. In this exhibit, she presents pieces of produce with the detail of an individual’s... Read more >

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Raising the Bar: How to Make Better Cocktails at Home with Audrey Saunders

Audrey Saunders of New York City's Pegu Club

 

We tapped the Pegu Club owner and 2013 JBF Gala mixologist to share her tips for better at-home mixology.

 

Simple Syrup, Simply Put

When it comes to cocktails, we don’t want to cook simple syrup; that increases its viscosity. There are exceptions, but we generally don’t want heaviness in a cocktail. Fill a bottle halfway with superfine sugar, which is gritless and dissolves instantly. (I like to repurpose 10-ounce glass soda bottles. They’re ideal for home use and a speed pourer fits perfectly into them.) Fill the other half with filtered, room-temperature water. Cap and shake well. The mixture will appear cloudy at first but will quickly settle. Top off with more water. When it’s transparent, it’s ready for use.

 

Vermouth: Smaller Is Better

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JBF on the Air: Allen Salkin

Allen Salkin on Taste Matters

 

On last week's episode of Taste Matters, JBF's Mitchell Davis invited author and former New York Times reporter Allen Salkin to join him in Heritage Radio Network's Brooklyn studios. He recently penned the book From Scratch: Inside the Food Network, a behind-the-scenes look at the big personalities, high drama, and cultural juggernaut of the famed television network. Allen filled Mitchell in on his writing process and provided a glimpse into the company's fascinating roller-coaster ride from chaos to conquest. Click here to listen to the full episode.

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