JBF Partners with Cooking up Change in the Fight for Better School Lunch

 

The James Beard Foundation is partnering with Cooking up Change and Healthy Schools Campaign

 

While the buzz surrounding the need for fresh and healthy school lunch has certainly grown louder on the food world’s radar, no one will deny that there’s still plenty to be done to improve American students’ diets. And whom better to consult than the students themselves?

 

That’s the strategy behind Cooking up Change, a student-chef competition whose winning recipes make their way into cafeterias around the country. Started by Healthy Schools Campaign, a Chicago-based non-profit, the contest takes place in six cities, inviting student-led teams to craft delicious school lunches within the “real-life constraints” of limited ingredient lists and tight deadlines. Finalists from each city will compete in the national competition in Washington, D.C. on May 21, and one dish from each team... Read more >

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Talking Sustainability and Scale in Charleston

 
 

In preparation for our 2012 JBF Food Conference, A Crisis in Confidence: Creating a Better, More Sustainable Food World We Can Trust, we're holding regional salons around the country to discuss the concept of trust in our food system. Our conference season officially kicked off on April 10 in Charleston, South Carolina, where we met with a diverse group of 18 insightful chefs, farmers, restaurateurs, educators, and other members of the Charleston food community. The participants were asked to consider the notion of trust through a variety of lenses—science, scale, and place. Last week, we shared the feedback on the concept of place, and yesterday, we shared the group's insights on science. Next up, we’d like to share what everyone had to say about the context of scale as... Read more >

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Talking Sustainability and Science in Charleston

 

Last week, we filled you in on our recent regional salon, held in preparation for our 2012 JBF Food Conference: A Crisis in Confidence: Creating a Better, More Sustainable Food World We Can Trust. The salon drew a diverse group of 18 insightful chefs, farmers, restaurateurs, educators, and other members of the Charleston food community who shared their opinions on what’s happening in today’s food system. The participants were asked to consider trust through a variety of lenses, and yesterday’s post was devoted to the notion of “place.” Next up, we’d like to share what everyone had to say about the context of science as it relates to trust in our food system:

 

Science had both positive and negative connotations for our participants. According to... Read more >

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