JBF on the Air: Hasia Diner

Hasia Diner on Taste Matters with Mitchell Davis

 

On this week's episode of Taste Matters, JBF's Mitchell Davis spoke with Hasia Diner, author and professor of Hebrew and Judaic studies and history at New York University, about the food culture of Irish, Italian, and Jewish immigrants. The pair discussed assumptions about American cuisine, authenticity, and the cultural, social, and economic practices relating to the production and consumption of food in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Click here to listen to the full episode.

 

Taste Matters is a radio program dedicated to taste: as a sense, cultural construct, and culinary phenomenon. However much we talk about where our... Read more >

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Sustainability Matters: March 21, 2014

 

A new Oceana report lists nine "dirty" U.S. fisheries blamed for hundreds of millions of pounds of bycatch each year. [Food Safety News]

 

Scientists find that chemicals used in agricultural pesticides and food products could cause in utero neurological damage. [The Atlantic]

 

Celebrate with cheese: new research reveals that there is no consistent link between saturated fat intake and heart disease. [NPR]

 

Are floating farms the future of food production? [Modern Farmer]... Read more >

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JBF on the Air: Erika Davis

Erika Davis

 

On this week's episode of Taste Matters, JBF's Mitchell Davis invited chocolatier, pastry chef, and Minority Chef Summit founder Erika Davis into Heritage Radio Network's Brooklyn studios. Erika filled Mitchell in on the upcoming four-day summit, which will take place in the Bahamas during May and is designed to serve as a platform for minority chefs to converge and participate in educational seminars, demonstrations, and specialty dining events that celebrate the minority culinary community. Click here to listen to the full episode.

 

Taste Matters is a radio program dedicated to taste: as a sense,... Read more >

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JBF on the Air: Myra Goodman

 

On this week's episode of Taste Matters, JBF's Mitchell Davis took a field trip to the TEDx Manhattan conference to speak with Myra Goodman, who was there to present "In Praise of Big Organic." As co-founder of Earthbound Farm, Myra oversees the operations of the largest producer of organic produce in North America and has recently authored the cookbook Straight from the Earth: Irresistible Vegan Recipes for Everyone. Click here to learn more and listen to the full episode. 

 

Taste Matters is a radio program dedicated to taste: as a sense, cultural construct, and culinary phenomenon. However much we talk about... Read more >

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Sustainability Matters: February 28, 2014

 

When slaughterhouses are shuttered due to meat recalls, the impact can be devastating on small ranchers. [Grist]

 

Environmental groups call for restrictions placed on fertilizer use in the Lake Erie area due to an increase in algae blooms, which threaten water safety and wildlife. [NY Times]

 

The Food and Drug Administration proposes a bigger, bolder food label with updated portion sizes. [Food Politics]

 

Chipotle's new web-based series Farmed & Dangerous provides a satirical, accessible way to learn about Big Ag in the American food system. [... Read more >

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JBF on the Air: Robert LaValva

 

On this week’s episode of Taste Matters, JBF’s Mitchell Davis invited Robert LaValva, founder of New Amsterdam Market, into Heritage Radio Network’s Brooklyn studios. Located in the historic South Street Seaport, New Amsterdam Market is New York City’s first permanent, indoor public market and wholesale distribution hub for local and sustainable food. Robert talks about the role of public markets in civic life, the Big Apple’s diverse marketplaces, the value of historic buildings, and the need for interactive public spaces in urban environs.​ Click here to listen to the full episode.

 

Taste Matters is a radio program dedicated... Read more >

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Sustainability Matters: February 21, 2014

 

Exposing food waste, a photographer documents "defective carrots" that are deemed too ugly to make it to supermarket shelves. [Treehugger]

 

In response to widespread consumer concern, meat-industry giants announce antibiotic-free chicken. [NPR]

 

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations sees small farmers as key to the development of sustainable food systems and food security. [The Guardian]

 

Consumer Reports investigates arsenic in the food system and what you can do about it. [... Read more >

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JBF on the Air: Atera's Matt Lightner

Matt Lightner on Taste Matters

 

On this week's episode of Taste Matters, JBF's Mitchell Davis took a field trip to lower Manhattan to interview chef Matt Lightner at his Michelin-starred restaurant, Atera. Offering only mysterious tasting experiences (diners eat over 20 courses but are not given a printed menu), Matt encourages his guests to let their imaginations run wild and guess the ingredients and composition in each dish. Mitchell and Matt discussed the interactions between the kitchen and dining room, how Matt is inspired by Basque cooking, and the new glut of tempting ingredients that's spoiling New York chefs. Click here to listen to the full episode.

 ... Read more >

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Sustainability Matters: February 14, 2014

tea

 

Rethinking what's in your cup: companies pledge to improve working conditions on India's tea plantations. [Grist]

 

For lower income students, snow days can mean empty stomachs. [NPR]

 

Cartoonist Joe Mohr illustrates the dangers of Bisphenol A, or BPA, with Popeye the Sailor. [Treehugger]

 

Why is nutrition so confusing? Blame the research environment. [NYT]

 

The future of vegetarian food substitutes might lie in Silicon Valley. [... Read more >

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ROC and Cornell University Posts Study on Restaurant Staff Turnover

 

In case you missed it, last month Restaurants Opportunities Centers United (ROC) posted an extensive study on staff turnover rates in American restaurants and how they affect bottom lines. The study, which was conducted by Cornell University's School of Industrial and Labor Relations, surveyed more than a thousand managers and assigned the examined establishments to one of four categories: fine upscale dining, casual fine dining, moderately priced family restaurants, and fast food/quick service (fast food) restaurants.

 

The study's conclusion? Turnover is very expensive. The ROC, whose mission is to increase wages and improve working conditions for the restaurant workforce, hopes the findings will be a "wake up call" to restaurant owners. If anything, the study has yielded an unprecedented trove of data about restaurant staffers in... Read more >

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