Market Haul: October 31

market haul

This week’s haul is a cornucopia of greens: broccoli, broccoli rabe, escarole, collards. To avoid getting overwhelmed, it’s never a bad idea to wash and blanch your greens all at once so they’re ready to go throughout the week. For those of you haven’t tried Japanese salad turnips, they’re sweet and juicy and absolutely delicious eaten raw in salads or quickly braised, as in the recipe below. Eat their tops as you would any greens—we’re partial to a simple sauté with olive oil and garlic.

The Haul: Sweet potatoes, broccoli rabe, escarole, salad turnips, collard greens, broccoli, and Mutsu and Cameo apples

The Menu Ideas:

Parmesan-Roasted Broccoli [Barefoot Contessa]
The recipe that will

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Recipe: Apple Brown Betty with Maple–Bacon Frozen Custard

Apple Brown Betty with Maple-Bacon Frozen Custard

Chef Tory Miller's irresistible recipe for apple Brown Betty, a cobbler-like dessert that dates back to Colonial times, is inspired by a popular New England twist on apple pie: he mixes shredded sharp cheddar cheese into the crumbly topping before baking. A Madison-based chef who's committed to sourcing as many of his ingredients from Wisconsin as he can, Miller uses a 15-year-old cheddar from Hook's Cheese Company. You can purchase their cheeses online or substitute any premium local cheddar cheese. Get the recipe here.

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Recipe Roundup: October 28, 2011

jackolantern

The blogosphere’s sprawling universe of recipes is inspiring, diverse, and—let’s face it—a bit daunting. Our recipe roundup does all the heavy sifting to single out recent, mouthwatering recipes from our favorite blogs. All you have to do is click and cook!

Pumpkin-Shaped Cheddar Crackers [SE]
Use a biscuit cutter and a paring knife to turn these flaky, cheddar crackers into little pumpkins. 

Homemade Peanut Butter Cups [

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Recipe Roundup: Wild Mushrooms

chanterelles

Though it can be next to impossible to get a wild mushroom forager to share his secret patch, it's never hard to find a recipe that puts the flavorful funghi to good use. Here are a few of our favorites. Soufflé Crêpes with Wild Mushrooms and Crescenza Cheese Golden crêpes are filled with earthy sautéed mushrooms and a savory pastry cream made with soft-ripened Crescenza cheese. Wild Mushroom Grits with Low Country Oyster Stew Use freshly shucked oysters in this classic Southern stew, which is served over creamy wild mushroom grits. Wild Mushroom and

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Recipe: Drunken Risotto with Wild Mushrooms

Drunken Risotto with Wild Mushrooms

Nothing complements a crisp, woodsy fall day better than a bowl of rich and toothsome risotto. This earthy version from chef Joel Huff features a grab bag of wild mushrooms, which will only be available for another week or so. (We've recently spotted chanterelles, king oysters, and maitakes at our local farmers' market.) For the wine, feel free to use any uncorked red you have on hand, though we prefer to pour in a Burgundy or Oregon Pinot Noir; the typical "forest floor" character found in these wines is a natural match for the other flavors in the dish. Get the recipe here.

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Market Haul: After Apple-Picking Edition

apples

For I have had too much 
Of apple-picking: I am overtired
 Of the great harvest I myself desired. –Robert Frost, “After Apple Picking”

Apple picking is an eagerly anticipated autumn ritual. Crisp fall air, cider donuts, hayrides, a bright wagon overflowing with apples that we are sure we will put to delicious use—sometimes it’s easy to get a little carried away. Once home with our invariably enormous haul, we begin to cook with the best of intentions. But after baking a pie or two and making a couple batches of applesauce without seeing a noticeable dent in the apple stores, panic can begin to set in. What’s an overly ambitious apple picker to do? Here are a few ideas.

The Haul: Apples. Many, many apples.

The Tools: A

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Recipe: Sticky Ginger Cake with Caramelized Pears

Sticky Ginger Cake with Caramelized Pears

When deciding on what to serve for dessert when entertaining a large group, it's often easiest to fall back on a shareable, one-pan pie or cake and call it a day. But if your kitchen's arsenal includes a muffin tin, you can easily prepare several individual desserts with the same amount of effort. Take these perfect-for-fall ginger cakes from chefs Tom Berry and Liz O’Connell. They're made with a standard cake batter that's sweetened with a simple date purée. After baking in a muffin tin, the charming cakes are slicked with a buttery rum glaze and topped with caramelized pears. Get the recipe here.

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Recipe: Kale Caesar Salad with Crispy Bacon, Garlic Panko Crumbs, and White Anchovies

Kale Caesar Salad with Crispy Bacon, Garlic Panko Crumbs, and White Anchovies

Crimped and crunchy kale leaves stand in for romaine in this spin on the classic Caesar salad from Boston chef Marc Orfaly. Oregano and chile flakes enliven the requisite bread crumbs, while hot sauce makes the dressing extra powerful. Get the recipe here.

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Eat this Word: Monte Cristo

Monte Cristo

WHAT? The count’s revenge? The origins of this rich sandwich of ham, chicken or turkey, and Swiss cheese that is either dipped in egg and fried in butter or made with already dipped and fried French toast are not clear. A staple of diners across the country, where it is sometimes served with jelly or maple syrup for dipping, the sandwich is thought to be related to the club sandwich, or maybe the Reuben (Jewish delicatessens sometimes substitute corned beef and sauerkraut for the traditional fillings). Lieut.-Col. Newnham-Davis, author of The Gourmet Guide to Europe (1903), suggests a Spanish ancestor, a sandwich from Seville for which "a slice of ham is put between two slices of bread and dipped in sherry, [then] in egg and fried." In truth the sandwich was probably the fruit of a creative line-cook’s imagination, or maybe just an accident. One thing that mystifies is the name. There is nothing in Dumas’s masterpiece to suggest why a

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In Season: Cranberry Beans

cranberry beans

Also known as borlotti, pink-flecked cranberry beans are available fresh in the late summer and fall. Creamy and flavorful, they’re delicious in soups or stews or can be tossed with olive oil and herbs for a simple side dish (though they lose their gorgeous coloring once cooked). If fresh cranberry beans are no longer available in your area, buy dried ones and soak overnight before cooking. How to Store: Fresh, unshelled cranberry beans can be stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for three to four days. Dried cranberry beans stored in a cool, dry area will keep for up to a year. How to Cook: Fresh cranberry beans are very easy to shuck. One pound of beans in the pod yields about 1 1/3 cups shucked beans, or enough for about two to three people. To cook, shell the beans and put them in a medium saucepan. Cover with cold water, bring to a boil, and cook until tender, about 20 to 25 minutes. To cook dried cranberry beans, soak

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