Eye Candy: Glorious Heirlooms

vegetables Portioned heirloom vegetables sit on a sheet pan before being plated as simple summer salads with garnishes of herbs and goat's-milk curd. The dish appeared on a Beard House menu prepared by the Aussie celebrity chef Adrian Richardson. Have a look at more photos here.

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Recipe: Gnocchi with Rabbit and Golden Ale Ragoût

A recipe for Gnocchi with Rabbit and Golden Ale Ragoût from the James Beard Foundation For this appealing gnocchi recipe, Aussie Adrian Richardson braises rabbit in ale until it’s fall-apart tender. “I love rabbit and beer,” he says. “What better than to bring the two together?”

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On the Menu: August 29 through September 4

Guests enjoy dinner at the Beard House. Here’s what’s happening at the Beard House next week: Tuesday, August 31, 7:00 P.M. Mediterranean Reflection The carefully curated menu at Adrian Richardson’s La Luna Bistro in Melbourne, Australia, reflects the chef’s Mediterranean heritage as well as his restraint and precision. Though his popular cooking show has made him a national celebrity, Richardson says he’s still most comfortable in the kitchen. September–October 2010 Greenhouse Gallery: Mushrooms Gloria Cunnick’s “Mushrooms” series evokes the mysterious and magical nature of fungi. With a BFA from Long Island University, Cunnick has shown her work in local, national, and international settings, and has been mentioned in the New York Times,

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Recipe: Pavlova

Pavlova Last night Australian chef Adrian Richardson served this light and sweet pavlova at the Beard House. Delightful in its textural contrast—a bite into the crunchy exterior exposes a gooey center that mimics marshmallow—the dessert is a joy to eat. Richardson tops his with mascarpone and passion fruit, but any light fruit will do.

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Eat this Word: Pavlova

PavlovaWHAT? Dancer's dessert. Named for the world-famous Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova, this fruit, whipped cream, and meringue dessert is claimed by rival nations. Aussies have long considered it their national dessert, but New Zealanders argue that they invented the Pavlova, and they back up their claim with citations from cookbooks. The dancer toured both countries in the late 1920s. In Perth, Australia, she stayed at the Esplanade Hotel, whose chef, Herbert Sachse, is often credited with creating the dessert some six years later. Supposedly the Pavlova acquired its name after someone proclaimed his dessert was "as light as Pavlova." Others think the name stems from the fact that the ring-shaped meringue resembled Pavlova's frilly, white costume in her most famous role, the Dying Swan. Pavlovas—which are showing up on American tables of late—are traditionally filled with passion fruit. WHERE?

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