Awards Watch: 2012 America’s Classics Award Honorees Announced

The James Beard Foundation Awards

Today we’re proud to announce the the newest class of America’s Classics inductees, which are listed below. You can read more about them here.

The Fry Bread House (4140 North 7th Avenue, Phoenix, Owner: Cecelia Miller)

Nora’s Fish Creek Inn (5600 West Highway 22, Wilson, WY, Owners: Nora Tygum, Trace Tygum, and Kathryn Tygum Taylor)

St. Elmo Steak House (127 South Illinois St., Indianapolis, Owners: Stephen Huse and Craig Huse)

Jones Bar-B-Q Diner (219 West Louisiana St., Marianna, AR, Owners: James and Betty Jones)

Shady Glen (840 East Middle Turnpike, Manchester, CT, Owners: William and Annette Hoch)

Comments (0)

America’s Classic: Noriega Restaurant and Hotel, Bakersfield, CA

Originally founded as a home away from home for shepherds, today the institution showcases the Basque culture of California’s San Joaquin Valley.

Comments (0)

Immaculate Infatuation: America's Classics

Crook's Corner, we're coming for you. Damn.

Comments (0)

America’s Classic: Crook’s Corner, Chapel Hill, NC

Since 1982, Crook’s Corner has carried the torch of regional foodways, employing and inspiring a generation of young culinary talent—including two James Beard Award–winning chefs.

Comments (0)

America’s Classic: Watts Tea Shop, Milwaukee

Many of the dishes at Watts Tea Shop, this fifth-generation Milwaukee institution, follow recipes that have been used since the 1930s.

Comments (0)

America’s Classic: Le Veau d’Or, NYC



Once a celebrity haunt, this midtown Manhattan French bistro serving classic French dishes straight out of Escoffier, is a time capsule.

Comments (0)

America’s Classic: Chef Vola’s, Atlantic City, NJ

Customers make pilgrimages to eat at Chef Vola’s, a traditional Italian-American eatery in Atlantic City, and our first America’s Classic of the night.

Comments (0)

Awards Watch: 2011 America's Classics Award Honorees

James Beard Awards medallion

Every year the James Beard Foundation inducts a handful of regional, characterful eateries into its America's Classics, a collection of restaurants known for quality food and lasting appeal. Whether it's the heart of a small community or a thriving vestige of a bygone era, every honoree has a treasured place in America's culinary culture. Today we're proud to announce the 2011 America's Classics inductees, which are listed below. You can read more about them here.

Chef Vola’s (111 South Albion Place, Atlantic City, NJ, 609.345.2022 – Owners:... Read more >

Comments (0)

America's Classics: The Bright Star, Bessemer, Alabama

America’s Classics Award–winning restaurants have timeless appeal and are beloved in their regions for quality food that reflects the character of their community. Here is the final eatery that earned this prestigious distinction in 2010. A clump of feta, tucked in a salad of iceberg and cucumbers. A stipple of oregano on a broiled snapper fillet. At the Bright Star in Bessemer, Alabama, an old steel town southwest of Birmingham, the vestiges of Greece are few. Greek immigrants built the Bright Star, a vintage dining hall of intricately patterned tile floors, nicotine-patinaed woodwork, WPA-era murals of the old country, and brass chandeliers. The Bright Star opened in 1907. Descendants of Bright Star founding fathers—Tom Bonduris and his cousin Bill Koikos, natives of the farming village of Peleta in the mountainous Peloponnesus region —still work the floor. Jimmy Koikos, a septuagenarian, and brother Nicky, seven years his junior, are in charge now. The menu is an honest—and very old—fusion, Greek meets Southern, as interpreted by African American cooks: fried red snapper throats, house-cut from whole Gulf fish, are on the menu

Comments (0)

America's Classics: Gustavus Inn, Gustavus, AK

America’s Classics Award–winning restaurants have timeless appeal and are beloved in their regions for quality food that reflects the character of their community. Over the next few weeks, we’ll be spotlighting the eateries that earned this prestigious distinction in 2010. Three generations of the Lesh family have welcomed guests to this farmhouse at the edge of a meadow overlooking Alaska's Icy Strait. Jack and Sally Lesh started the inn in 1965, operating it as a drop-in restaurant, grocery store, and hotel. For many years it was also the town’s weather station, airline counter, and radio and telephone contact. From 1976 to '79 their daughter Sal and husband, Tom McLaughlin, continued these services, supporting the crew building nearby Glacier Bay Lodge. Dave and JoAnn Lesh took over as innkeepers in 1980 and raised their three sons and daughter there. Over the years, the town has acquired power, phones, and city status, allowing the Gustavus Inn to rely more on serving tourists to Glacier Bay National Park during the summer months. Supper is served family style and usually features local catches like Dungeness crab, salmon,

Comments (0)

Pages