America's Classics: Maneki

Maneki A restaurant doesn’t have to serve fried chicken or pie to be an America’s Classic. Our list of America’s Classics represents the wide variety of cultures, cuisines, and people that make up the country’s food scene.  At first mention, Japanese food might not seem like a natural choice, but Maneki is a perfect example of a classic American eatery. Maneki is a family-owned enterprise whose roots stretch back to the early years of the twentieth century. Some believe it was founded in 1904. Others claim a date of 1911. No matter; it’s the only surviving restaurant from Seattle’s once bustling Japantown. Since 1974, the Nakayama family has been at the helm, first Kozo, now his wife, Jean. Maneki has long claimed a place at the center of Seattle’s Japanese-American community. In the 1930s one of the restaurant’s dishwashers was a University of Washington student named Takeo Miki, who later served,

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Awards Watch: The 2010 America’s Classics Winners

beard medal

If our 2010 America’s Classics Award winners got together to prepare dinner, it would be one incredible meal. Maybe they’d start things... Read more >

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America's Classics: Doe's Eat Place

Doe's Eat Place Every one of America’s Classics has a unique story to tell, but together these restaurants represent the country’s rich fabric and illustrate how the closest communities cohere around food. As 2007 award recipient Shug Signa said about her family’s 68-year-old restaurant, Doe’s Eat Place in Greenville, Mississippi, “People come together, never meet a stranger, and it’s the American way.” This family-owned and -operated restaurant is an icon of the culinary and cultural landscape of the Mississippi Delta. Doe’s Eat Place grew out of a 1940s grocery store that sold homemade hot tamales, eventually transforming itself into a casual steak joint that served both the African-American and white communities in segregated Mississippi. Pivotal during the civil rights era, Doe’s Eat Place has become a symbol of the region’s multiracial culture. Learn more about America's Classics and watch a video about Doe's Eat Place by visiting

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America's Classics: Our Favorite Classics

Camp Washington ChiliCamp Washington Chili in Cincinnati

Former Gourmet reporters-at-large Jane and Michael Stern did adventurous diners and curious travelers a valuable service when they published Roadfood, an exhaustive, no-morsel-untasted compilation of out-of-the-way regional food joints in the United States. It's no surprise that their ultimate list dovetails with JBF's own down-home eatery hall of fame, America's Classics. We invited the Sterns to look over our honored restaurants and highlight their five favorites;

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America's Classics: Weaver D’s, Athens, GA

Weaver D's Each year at the Beard Awards, we give out a handful of special honors called America’s Classics. A wide range of restaurants have been recognized as America’s Classics, from steakhouses to clam shacks, but the common thread is that they each have a timeless appeal—and are renowned in their regions for serving quality food that reflects the character of their community. Owned by the self-proclaimed “Professor of Soul” Dexter Weaver, Weaver D’s is a fixture in Athens, Georgia. Beloved for its traditional soul food as well as its colorful proprietor, Weaver D’s keeps locals and tourists coming back for spot-on fried chicken, sweet potato casserole, buttermilk cornbread, and the restaurant’s signature squash casserole. Learn more about America’s Classics and watch a video about Weaver D’s here.

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America's Classic: Yank Sing

Whether it’s a clam shack near the shore, a barbecue joint on the outskirts of town, or a sub shop on the busiest city street, chances are your favorite local restaurant is a James Beard Foundation America’s Classics Award winner. Each week at Delights & Prejudices we'll profile one of these classic restaurants. This time it's the Bay Area dim sum mainstay Yank Sing. Henry Chan has made it his life's work to "uplift dim sum." At San Francisco's Yank Sing he has been serving dim sum classics like har gow and Shanghai dumplings alongside newer innovations such as phoenix shrimp and cabbage salad with honeyed walnuts to thousands of diners every day for over half a century. His mother opened Yank Sing's

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America's Classic: Arnold's Country Kitchen

Whether it’s a clam shack near the shore, a barbecue joint on the outskirts of town, or a sub shop on the busiest city street, chances are your favorite local restaurant is a James Beard Foundation America’s Classics Award winner. Each week at Delights + Prejudices we profile one of these classic restaurants. Next up, Nashville's meat and threes paradise Arnold's Country Kitchen. Co-owner Jack Arnold favors overalls and foulard bow ties. He began his restaurant career as a dishwasher, at the age of 12. While studying art at Vanderbilt University, he managed the campus cafeteria. By 1983 he had his own place, Arnold's Country Kitchen, a concrete block building, outfitted with a steam table and a tray line

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America's Classic: Totonno's

Whether it’s a clam shack near the shore, a barbecue joint on the outskirts of town, or a sub shop on the busiest city street, chances are your favorite local restaurant is a James Beard Foundation America’s Classics Award winner. Each week at Delight's + Prejudices we'll profile one of these classic restaurants. First up, a pizza lover's favorite: Coney Island's Totonno's. A stone's throw from the Cyclone, Totonno's has been serving Neapolitan-style pies for more than 80 years, interrupted for the first time only recently when a fire forced the restaurant to close for several months for

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Awards Watch: America's Classics

The black-tied chefs here tonight who toil in fine dining kitchens have no doubt earned the honors they receive, but there's a special place in everyone's heart for the winners of the America's Classics. These local eateries are fixtures in their communities. They are the places you want to eat should you find yourself in the neighborhood. Most have been around for generations. And they serve the sort of down-home, delicious food that James Beard loved. Here is a complete list of the more than 60 recipients who have received this special award.

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