Reel Food: Bill Dorrler's Peach Panzanella

New Jersey chef Bill Dorrler crossed the Hudson last week to cook his signature modern Italian fare at the Beard House. His main course was a grilled rack of lamb, and in the clip below he discusses the accompanying peach panzanella.

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Reel Food: Bill Dorrler's Peach Panzanella

New Jersey chef Bill Dorrler crossed the Hudson last week to cook his signature modern Italian fare at the Beard House. His main course was a grilled rack of lamb, and in the clip below he discusses the accompanying peach panzanella.

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Recipe: Dave Racicot's White Bean Purée

White Bean PuréeTomorrow night at the Beard House, chef Dave Racicot will be preparing an elegant, French-inspired dinner. One of the elements in his multi-course menu is this deliciously creamy white bean purée. He’ll be serving it with molasses and bay leaf gelées, apple jam, chorizo chips, and maple cream, but you can whip it up at home and serve it with crusty French bread or roasted veggies.

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Recipe: Dave Racicot's White Bean Purée

White Bean PuréeTomorrow night at the Beard House, chef Dave Racicot will be preparing an elegant, French-inspired dinner. One of the elements in his multi-course menu is this deliciously creamy white bean purée. He’ll be serving it with molasses and bay leaf gelées, apple jam, chorizo chips, and maple cream, but you can whip it up at home and serve it with crusty French bread or roasted veggies.

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Reel Food: Will Gilson Breaks It Down—Pig, That Is.

Last week Cambridge chef Will Gilson served us a "farmers' market–fed pig tasting" using two pigs he raised specifically for his Beard House dinner (he also went deep-sea fishing to collect lobster off the Massachusetts shore for his corn and lobster succotash—that's a dedicated locavore!). In the video below, Gilson gives a tour of the dish.

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Eat this Word: Sea Urchin

Sea UrchinWHAT? A no brainer. If you’ve stepped on one of these spiny creatures while strolling along the beach you’re not likely to forget the pain. Similarly memorable is the sea-kissed, faintly iodine taste of the custardy roe—when fresh. Sea urchins are brainless echinoderms that live on the ocean floor. Their hard shells (called tests) are covered with pointed spines that they use for locomotion, food gathering, and protection. Evidently, their unfriendly exterior is effective; in 2003 BBC News reported that sea urchins can live for over 200 years. To the urchins’ human predators, the saffron-colored roe (the only edible part) is considered a delicacy. Most sea urchins harvested in the United States are exported to Japan, where the roe, called uni, is used extensively in sushi and other dishes. WHERE? Michael Solomonov's Beard House dinner

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On the Menu: August 9 to August 15

Kitchen Here’s what happening at the Beard House next week: Tuesday, August 11, 7:00 P.M. Del Frisco’s Divine Wine Dinner Moving beyond the chophouse template, the chefs at the helm of the acclaimed Del Frisco’s steakhouses have designed an elegant, European-inspired menu. Accompanying them at the Beard House will be the restaurant group’s wine director, David O’Day, who has chosen a heavenly selection of wines to pair with the meal. Wednesday, August 12, 12:00 P.M. Beard on Books In The Sweeter Side of Amy's Bread: Cakes, Cookies, Bars, Pastries and More from New York City's Favorite Bakery Amy Scherber shares recipes for the sweet treats that make Amy’s Bread a perennial NYC favorite. The veteran pastry chef offers her expertise on techniques

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Eat This Word: Succotash

The James Beard Foundation on succotash
WHAT? Daffy's favorite side dish. ("Suffering succotash!") Indians introduced colonists to this mix of beans and corn (the Indian version sometimes included bear meat) and gave the dish its name, which derives from msickquatash, Narraganset for boiled kernels of corn. In A Tramp Abroad, Mark Twain listed succotash (along with possom, coon, and cobblers) among the food from home that he most craved while he was traveling. Ronald Reagan once used the word as a substitute for "Podunk" to mean a backwater place; in so doing, he incensed the 600 residents of Succotash Point, Rhode Island. Sadly, so many Americans were raised on loathsome frozen succotash vegetable mix, they've written off what food writer John Thorne has described as "a quintessential summer dish...with a wonderfully delicate flavor."

WHERE? Will Gilson's Beard House dinner

WHEN? August 4, 2009

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On the Menu: August 2 to August 8

Kitchen Here’s what happening at the Beard House next week: Tuesday, August 4, 7:00 P.M. New England Garden Dinner How often can say you’ve eaten a pig raised specifically for your dinner? Chef Will Gilson, a JBF Award semifinalist this year, is doing just that for this special farm-to-table meal. Gilson’s seasonal, New England–inspired cuisine embodies the locavore movement—almost all of his ingredients come from his own farm. Wednesday, August 5, 7:00 P.M. From the Land and Sea This pair of modern Italian hot spots have considerable pedigree: they’re owned by François Rousseau, an alum of the Ryland Inn and Gramercy Tavern, developed in consultation with JBF Award winner Michael White, and presided over by talented chef Bill Dorrler, whose

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Eat this Word: Rillettes [ree-YEHT]

RillettesWHAT? Coveted crock. "I certainly had never had the happiness of seeing that brown mess spread on slices of bread and butter," recalled Honoré de Balzac of watching his schoolmates eat the savory spread he so desired. A native of Tours, the French literary legend may have belonged to one of the few families that couldn't afford the humble specialty of the region, where the fatty favorite is lovingly referred to as "brown jam." As with other pâtés and terrines, rillettes begin with chopped meat, salted and cooked slowly in fat (the recipe dates back to the 15th century Loire Valley, where it was likely created to use up leftover scraps of pork). The tender morsels are then shredded and stored in ramekins or crocks covered with additional fat. This age-old technique results in a rustic yet deliciously creamy paste that has aromas of garlic, bay leaf, thyme, and wine. Literally translated, rillettes means "plank," which probably refers to its appearance when

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