Eye Candy: Beard House

Enzo Fargione While plating the first course of his inventive and ambitious dinner, Enzo Fargione finished his branzino carpaccio with a citrus dressing. Every Beard House diner received the course in their own cigar box, which chef Fargione pumped full of smoke for added flavor and theatrical effect. June 17, 2009, The Beard House, NYC (Photo by Tom Kirkman)

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Bagna Cauda

Bagna CaudaWHAT? A hot soak for your veggies. Bagna cauda, Italian for hot bath, is a very old dish with a Piedmont pedigree. Once considered a poor man's meal, bagna cauda has become one of the region's most popular foods. The "bath" is a tangy sauce made from garlic, olive oil, and anchovy; butter is often added in as well. To keep the sauce hot, it's typically served over a flame. Raw, or sometimes lightly cooked vegetables, cut into bite-size pieces, are dipped into it using a long-pronged fork. In Piedmont, fennel, cauliflower, cabbage, and red peppers are the veggies of choice, but any vegetable that's good to eat raw works well with bagna cauda, too. WHERE? Enzo Fargione's Beard House dinner WHEN? June 17, 2009

Comments (0)