Eat This Word: Conch

 

WHAT? Over the centuries, Caribbean islanders have played tunes on the conch, drunk from it, made tools from it, adorned homes with it, used it as a primitive form of money, and--best of all--eaten it. "There is no doubt that since time immemorial, man has been breaking open conch shells in order to get at the succulent flesh inside," according to Culinaria, A Culinary Discovery: The Caribbean. The meat of this sea snail is tough and needs tenderizing with lime or by pounding before cooking. Its taste has been compared to clams and scallops. Conch, which propels itself along the ocean floor with its foot-like muscle, is used to make stews, chowders, and fritters. In the 17th century, the beautiful spiraled pink shell of the Queen Conch was prized in Europe. Today, entire conch orchestras make beautiful music in Key West at the island's annual Conch Blowing Contest.

 ... Read more >

Comments (0)

Chase Sapphire Preferred® Visa Signature® Presents James Beard Foundation's Taste America®

James Beard Foundation's® Taste America

 

At the James Beard Foundation, we specialize in the one of a kind. The annual James Beard Awards, known as the "Oscars of food," are the restaurant industry's premier event, while the James Beard House hosts some of the most singular dining experiences you'll find anywhere.

 

The James Beard Foundation's Taste America® is no exception. This year's ten-city tour includes some of the most remarkable chef collaborations we've ever assembled, from a visionary of molecular gastronomy joining forces with a Southern-food defender, to one of the country's most celebrated French masters teaming up with the queen of the gastropub.

 

The most exclusive access at Taste America events is reserved only for Chase Sapphire Preferred® Visa Signature® cardmembers via... Read more >

Comments (0)

Eat This Word: Jaggery

Jaggery

 

WHAT? A dark, unrefined sugar, jaggery is used in Southeast Asia and India, regions where-we're told-sugar is considered good for you! Jaggery, which accounts for 50 percent of the sugar eaten in India, is made from sugar cane and is processed by a method not unlike that used to make maple syrup. The sweet sap from the sugarcane is boiled down while several people help stir the steadily thickening syrup. The finished product has a distinctive taste and can have a consistency as soft as honey-butter or as solid as fudge. India's epic narrative Mahabharata describes how jaggery (and gur, a sugar made from date palms) was used in sophisticated sweets at the time of Lord Krishna's appearance 5,000 years ago. 

 

WHERE? Eating Stories: Montreal to New Delhi 

 ... Read more >

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Huckleberry

Huckleberries

 

WHAT? Perhaps more associated with Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn than with fine cuisine, huckleberries grow most widely in the West, and along Midwestern rivers, like the Mississippi, on which Huck spent so many days lazing. Huckleberries come in many shades, including pink, white, blue-black, and purple, with the blue-black variety being the firmest and most widely available in the marketplace. James Beard was a fan, writing in American Cookery that they were “wonderful to the taste.” Unlike their close relatives, blueberries and cranberries, which have a multitude of soft, little seeds in their center, each huckleberry contains ten hard, small seeds, and their flavor is more tart. Huckleberries are not cultivated; their growing season is typically from June through August. According to Beard, they “make good pies and cakes and other typically American delights.”

 

WHERE? Jackson... Read more >

Comments (0)

Eat This Word: Daube

Daube

 

WHAT? "Daube might be called a more rustic cousin of boeuf à la bourguignonne, typically made with heartier red wine and perfumed with earthy dried cèpes," according to Saveur Cooks Authentic French. Daubes resemble many stews in that the meat is first browned over a high heat. Then aromatic vegetables and braising liquid (water, stock, or wine) are added, and the covered mixture is simmered for hours. Daubes are cooked in daubières, which can be made out of earthenware, stoneware, or copper. Daube de boeuf, traditionally affiliated with Provence, is the best-known daube, but every part of France has a variation, which may contain vegetables as varied as artichokes and celery, and other meats such as pork, goose, pheasant, and lamb. Originally, the cooking term daube referred to a meat dish that was braised and then served cold, but now they are almost all served hot.

 

WHERE? French... Read more >

Comments (0)

James Beard Foundation's Taste America® Preview: Atlanta

 

We’re off to the races this weekend with the first stops on the James Beard Foundation’s Taste America® national food festival! The epicurean tour kicks off with two days in Atlanta, where James Beard Award Winner and Taste America All-Star Barbara Lynch will team up with James Beard Award–winning local chef Anne Quatrano. Join us Friday for a reception featuring dishes from some of the city’s hottest chefs, followed by a special dinner prepared by Lynch and Quatrano, who are joining forces on this unique menu for one night only. On Saturday the duo will take their skills to Sur La Table for cooking demos and book signings, where you’ll also have the chance to mix the national with the local with free tastings from local vendors High Road Craft Ice Cream & Sorbet and Spotter Trotter Charcuterie.

 ... Read more >

Comments (0)

James Beard Foundation's Taste America® Preview: Phoenix

Sherry Yard and Kevin Binkley

 

The James Beard Foundation’s Taste America® national epicurean tour begins this weekend with two days of star-studded events in Phoenix, featuring Taste America All-Star and JBF Award-winning Pastry Chef Sherry Yard, and local star Kevin Binkley. Friday night kicks off with a tasting reception from some of Phoenix’s finest, followed by an exclusive four course dinner prepared by Yard and Binkley. Saturday the action moves to Sur La Table, for cooking demos and book signings from Yard and James Beard Award Winner Chris Bianco, along with free tastings from local vendors Essence Bakery Café and Sphinx Date Co. Palm & Pantry.

 

For tickets and more information about the chefs and vendors appearing, check out jbftasteamerica.org... Read more >

Comments (0)

Eat This Word: Hush Puppies

Hush Puppies

 

WHAT? Though just lumps of deep-fried cornmeal batter, this Southern classic can inspire reveries from people below the Mason-Dixon line, where an abiding nostalgia for fish fries and pig pickin's (pork barbecues) requires a steady supply of hush puppies. "A plate of fried fish seems mighty lonely without them," Angela Shelf Medearis wrote in The African American Kitchen, and Southern cooking maven Nathalie Dupree served fried catfish with hush puppies at her wedding. The unusual name is usually attributed to people trying to quiet dogs by throwing them bits of fried treats. Who those people were depends on which story you believe--plantation servants carrying food to the dining room, Southerners hiding from Yankees during the Civil War; Reconstructionists pitying dogs left starving due to food shortages, or hunters rewarding hungry hounds after day-long excursions. Regardless, when hush puppies are made well, there's nothing like 'em. Chow down.

 ... Read more >

Comments (0)

On the Menu: Week of September 8

Wine Glasses

 

Here's what's coming up in the JBF universe:

 

Monday, September 8, 7:00 P.M 
Chef Collaboration 
Close friends and culinary kindred spirits Jesse Schenker, of the Gander and acclaimed West Village restaurant Recette, and Seth Siegel-Gardner and Terrence Gallivan, of the Pass and Provisions in Houston, are combining their cross-country talents to create one incredible, collaborative meal.

 

Tuesday, September 9, 7:00 P.M
Virginia Rising Stars 
Experience Virginia’s dining renaissance at the Beard House when we host the state’s rising culinary stars for a spectacular collaborative meal. The night’s menu will feature the chefs’ favorite local ingredients, Virginia-sourced wine pairings, and stellar cocktails from formidable mixologist and restaurant owner Stefan Trummer.... Read more >

Comments (0)

Eat This Word: Romesco

Romesco

 

WHAT? This classic sauce is a specialty of the Tarragona province in the Catalonia region of northeastern Spain. The only essential ingredient that chefs agree on is the special red pepper that gives the sauce its name. Some contend the formula should be nothing more than a simple mixture of olive oil, red pepper, and bread, while others liven it up with flavorful ingredients, such as garlic, wine, chili powder, paprika, almonds or hazelnuts, and vinegar to the blend. Regardless of the recipe, the final product is usually a smooth paste, typically served with grilled poultry or fish. Each spring, there is a competition among fishermen in the Serrallo district of the province to produce the best romesco. Before thousands of spectators, the romesco-masters—who only pass their secret recipes on to their sons—set to work with their mortars and pestles to compete for the championship title.

 ... Read more >

Comments (0)

Pages