On the Menu: February 20 through February 26

On the Menu Here’s what’s happening at the Beard House next week: Wednesday, February 23, 12:00 P.M. Beard on Books Ten years ago, former New York Times Magazine writer Molly O’Neill embarked on a cross-country journey to investigate the so-called “end of American cooking.” Instead she found scores of Americans making daily tributes to their cultural and filial histories through food. Ten years, 300,000 miles, and 5,000 interviews later, O’Neill has compiled the recipes she gathered from across the nation in One Big Table: A Portrait of American Cooking.  Part cookbook, part historical record, One Big Table chronicles not just what we eat, but why—from foraged dandelion and spring garlic salad to pueblo tamales and Rice Krispies treats. Wednesday, February 23, 7:00 P.M.

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On the Menu: October 24 through October 30

A view of the Beard house from the back patio. Here’s what’s happening at the Beard House and around the country next week: Sunday, October 24, 12:00 P.M. Tutto Toscana Brunch The classic Italian brunch may be the simple duo of cappuccino and cornetto, but we knew the country’s culinary crema would do wonders with the American breakfast when given the chance. In their farewell to the Apicius culinary school’s Tutto Toscana series, the faculty will prepare a delicious brunch that draws on Tuscany’s culinary traditions. Monday, October 25, 7:00 P.M. East Coast Meets Spain Named after the Spanish word for “foam,” Espuma also evokes the Delaware restaurant’s coastal locale, which offers endless inspiration for Jay Caputo’s New American cuisine.

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The Bookshelf: Andrew Coe

Chop SueyIf you find connections between eating and culture fascinating, take note: Andrew Coe, who has written for Saveur, Gastronomica, and the New York Times, has published Chop Suey: A Cultural History of Chinese Food in the United States. With over 40,000 Chinese restaurants in the country, many Americans take this food (or, rather, its Americanized versions and offshoots) for granted. But with a timeline that includes violence, late 19th-century Bohemia, and modern political diplomacy, Chop Suey exposes the cuisine’s extraordinary development in the West. A Brooklyn resident and frequent patron of New York’s Chinese eateries, Coe is the Chinese food lover’s compass. Even though his motto is “Eat now, talk later,” he took a moment to tell us about his favorite spots in the

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