Hugh Acheson: What is New York Cuisine?

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For the New York issue of our member newsletter, JBF Notes, we asked past Best Chef award winners from regions around the country to tell us what cuisine in the Big Apple means to them, and, of course, for their must-visit spots when they're in town. We'll be posting their responses throughout the week. Next up: Hugh Acheson, winner of the 2012 Best Chef: South award and chef of Five & Ten, the National, and Empire State South.

 

What is New York cuisine?

 

New York City has an overflowing basket of cuisines based on people busting their asses to make it great. It's a place where dreams are made under implausible circumstances, but from them comes something beautiful. The common thread is dedication to working hard and showcasing a most wondrous city. It should always revel in... Read more >

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Recipe Roundup: Citrus

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Brighten your winter table with one of these vibrant, citrus-inflected dishes.

Orange-Marcona Almond Salad with Pineapple Granita Think outside the navel: chef Jehangir Mehta suggests experimenting with different types of oranges when making this vivid, refreshing salad.

Macadamia-Crusted Scallops with Citrus Beurre Blanc Butter sauce made with a squeeze of orange and lime juice enlivens these crunchy, golden brown scallops.

... Read more >

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Recipe: Cuban Braised Pork Shoulder

braised pork shoulderHugh Acheson's Cuban-inspired braised pork shoulder is the perfect dish for the last leg of winter. Spicy, comforting, and brightened with a trio of lemon, lime, and orange zests, it will help keep your spirits aloft through the thaw.

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Eye Candy: Beard House

Peaches on Daikon This hors d'oeuvre of Georgia sturgeon caviar with pickled peaches, mimosa, and daikon was served by Hugh Acheson and Peter Dale at their Beard House dinner; the meal featured peaches in every course. Want to put a savory twist on peaches for dinner tonight? Try chef Dale's flavorful Roasted Red Pepper, Peach, and Sweet Onion Salad as an accompaniment for fish, pork, or even simple slices of grilled bread. July 9, 2009, The Beard House, NYC (Photo by Michael Johnston)

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Eat this Word: Boiled Peanuts

Boiled PeanutsWHAT? Dixie Dorito. With their quirky Lee Bros. Boiled Peanuts Catalogue, Matt and Ted Lee brought this Deep South treat to the attention of New Yorkers about a decade ago. The Lee Bros. catalogue, which can be found online at www.boiledpeanuts.com, offers lots of tips about the snack, not to mention an “I brake for boiled peanuts” T-shirt. Their peanuts, the siblings promise, “are guaranteed to turn any party into a cultural event.” To make the snack, raw unshelled peanuts (either fresh “green” or dry) are boiled in salted water for as much as two hours. The resulting snack is closer to edamame than to roasted peanuts, and, like edamame, is eaten by popping open the shell and slurping the peanut and salty brine. In many parts of the south, boiled peanuts are sold as a roadside snack. In Hoppin’ John’s Lowcountry Cooking, Southern food expert John Martin Taylor wrote, “No one knows the origin of our singular treat, but to

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