What We're Reading: August 26, 2015

 

Dig into a loganberry pie, a spiedie, and more regional American delicacies. [FWF

 

Want the sweetest, juiciest pineapple? Turn it upside down. [Food52

 

Coconut milk is for so much more than curries. [Serious Eats

 

Yes, there really is a wrong way to reheat leftovers. [The Kitchn

 

More fungus among us: American chefs are... Read more >

Comments (0)

Eat This Word: Huitlacoche

 

WHAT? Fancy fungus. A bulbous grey or black fungus that grows on ears of corn, huitlacoche used to be considered a nuisance by American farmers, who routinely destroyed crops "infected" with the blight and lobbied to make imports illegal. But in the late 1980s, chefs like Josephina Howard of NYC's Rosa Mexicano began promoting huitlacoche for its earthy, smoky flavor and its role in traditional Mexican cuisine. On September 12, 1989, Howard headlined a celebratory all-huitlacoche dinner at the James Beard House. Today, the delicacy is so savored that it is commonly referred to as the Mexican truffle.

 

WHO? The Pubbelly Boys 

 

WHEN? Tuesday, June 9, 2015

 

HOW? Huitlacoche Croquetas with Sweet Corn Aïoli 

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Huitlacoche

huitlacocheWHAT? Fancy fungus. A bulbous grey or black fungus that grows on ears of corn, huitlacoche used to be considered a nuisance by American farmers, who routinely destroyed crops "infected" with the blight and lobbied to make imports illegal. But in the late 1980s, chefs like Josephina Howard of NYC's Rosa Mexicano began promoting huitlacoche for its earthy, smoky flavor and its role in traditional Mexican cuisine. On September 12, 1989, Howard headlined a celebratory All Huitlacoche Dinner at the James Beard Foundation. Today, the delicacy is so savored that it is commonly referred to as the Mexican truffle. WHERE? Margaritte Malfy and Barbara Sibley’s Beard House brunch WHEN? November 1, 2009 HOW?

Comments (0)