Eat This Word: Kaffir Lime


The James Beard Foundation on kaffir lime
WHAT? Fragrant fruit. Until recently, American cooks had a hard time getting hold of Kaffir limesbumpy-skinned, deep green, intensely fragrant citrus fruits that give a jolt of flavor to many Southeast Asian dishes. Dried or fresh, the leaves, rind, and juice of the fruit are indispensable elements in enlivening soups, salads, and curries. Kaffir limes are used in the cuisines of such countries as Thailand, Malaysia, and Indonesia "with a frequency bordering on automaticity," Alan Davidson writes in The Oxford Companion to Food. Davidson, incidentally, objects to the name Kaffir and suggests the alternative of Makrut lime, the Thai word. Kaffir, he writes, probably comes from the Arabic word for infidel and has long been used in South Africa as a pejorative term for blacks.

WHERE? Team New Jersey Beard House dinner

WHEN? January 26, 2011

HOW? Poha

Comments (0)

On the Menu: Middle Eastern Magic

Ana Sortun JBF Award winner Ana Sortun and Maura Kilpatrick of Boston’s Oleana and Sofra are bringing their inventive take on Eastern Mediterranean cuisine to the Beard House on Thursday with a mezze-inspired menu. Former Oleana sommelier Theresa Paopao will select the wine pairings, and Siena Farms will provide the locally grown produce. Here's what's on the menu: Hors d’Oeuvre Cheese Puffs with Persian Carrot Jam Kumquats with Goat Cheese and Halvah Brussels Sprout Dolmades with Sesame Seeds, Walnuts, and Pomegranate Kingfish Nayeh with Pickled Red Onions and Herb Salad Monkfish with Black Garlic–Tahini Sauce and Fried Pita Bread Pairing: Prosecco Cocktails with Winter Citrus and Persian Spices Dinner Assorted Mezze > Braised Gigante Beans with Whipped Feta and Wild Greek Herbs; Winter Green Vegetable Tzatziki on Za’atar Bread; and Fattoush with Escarole, Apple,

Comments (0)

On the Menu: January 16 through January 22

Guests mingle in the Beard House Here’s what’s happening at the Beard House and around the country next week: Wednesday, January 19, 12:00 noon Beard on Books: Dana Cowin and Kate Heddings In Food & Wine Reinventing the Classics, the stylish and popular magazine's editors present reimagined classic dishes like cheddar B.L.T. burgers with Russian dressing, Thai green curry chicken wings, and butterscotch sticky buns. It's the perfect cookbook for cooks who want to breathe new life into their repertoire. Wednesday, January 19, 7:00 P.M. Colorado Ranch and Farm Boulder chef Eric Skokan of the Black Cat returns to the Beard House with his French-inflected yet utterly American cuisine. For this dinner, he has designed a

Comments (0)

Eye Candy: Oh My, Pumpkin Pie

Savory pumpkin pies Rows of savory pumpkin pies sit on a baking sheet during Kevin Lasko and Richard Leach's Beard House dinner. Check out more photos of the meal.

Comments (0)

On the Menu: Meatballs Galore

Daniel Holzman and Michael Chernow Partners Daniel Holzman and Michael Chernow have made a ballsy foray into the Lower East Side dining scene with the opening of their singularly focused eatery, the Meatball Shop. Holzman, whose culinary credits include San Francisco’s Fifth Floor and Jardinière, elevates the humble classic with a meatball-centric menu as cheeky as it is delicious. The duo will prepare a one-of-a-kind luncheon at the Beard House this Friday (book here); here's what's on the menu: Hors d’Oeuvre Miniature Maryland Crabmeat and Potato Chip Meatballs with Old Bay Dipping Sauce Miniature Buffalo Chicken Meatballs with Blue Cheese Dipping Sauce Reuben Meatball Sliders with Sauerkraut and Thousand Island Dressing Pairing: Ca’ Furlan Cuvée Beatrice Prosecco NV Luncheon

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Farofa

farofaWHAT? Flour power. "The farofa is an acquired taste that, once actually acquired, is difficult to give up," according to the website of the Brazilian Embassy in London. They've definitely acquired it in Brazil, where the fried manioc (cassava or yuca) flour can be found on tables across the country. It can be fried in butter, pork fat, or oil, and cooked with onions, raisins, sausage, bacon, bananas, olives, eggs, or cabbage (among hundreds of other options that depend on the cook's creativity). It's eaten hot or at room temperature, and its addictive crunchy yet starchy texture, as well as its sauce-soaking quality, make it an essential topping for a variety of dishes, including the nationally acclaimed feijoada. WHERE? Adam Schop's Beard House dinner WHEN?

Comments (0)

What We Loved in 2010

Curtis Duffy's dish at the James Beard Awards; Karen DeMasco's budino at Chefs & Champagne
 

The JBF editors collectively checked in at hundreds of restaurants and events in 2010; here are a dozen dishes that made us sit up and pay attention (and lick our plates clean):

Curtis Duffy's Alaskan King Crab with Cucumber Consommé, Kalamansi, Floral Cream, and Lemon Balm at the James Beard Awards
The ingredient list reads like a perfume label, but there was nothing overpowering about this dish: the aromatics perfectly complemented the creamy chunks of crab. We also loved the Grant Achatz protégé’s artful presentation.

Linton Hopkin's Roast... Read more >

Comments (0)

Eat This Word: Chai

The James Beard Foundation on chai

WHAT? Spicy sipper. Chai is the Hindi word for “tea,” which makes a coffeehouse order of a “chai tea latte” redundant. (The word passed into Chinese and Japanese as “cha.”) The fragrant, milky beverage we’re referring to goes by “masala chai” in India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Tibet, where it is an integral part of every social gathering. To make the tea, a combination of sweet and savory spices such as cloves, star anise, peppercorn, cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, and fennel are ground, boiled in water, steeped with black tea, strained, and mellowed with milk and honey. According to Indian cooking expert Julie Sahni, “The people in cooler parts of India have traditionally added spices to their tea, not just for flavoring, but also to induce heat in the body. Spiced teas are particularly welcome after an Indian meal, because they provide a gentle, more graceful ending to the intricately spiced Indian dishes.” She adds, “A plain

Comments (0)

On the Menu: Michael Chiarello

Michael Chiarello Many vintages ago at Tra Vigne, Top Chef Masters finalist Michael Chiarello’s local, Italian-inspired cooking helped define Napa Valley’s wine-friendly cuisine. Now at Bottega on his own vineyard, he and chef de cuisine Nick Ritchie continue to craft a personal, Mediterranean-based cuisine. Here's what he'll be serving at the Beard House this Wednesday: Hors d’Oeuvre Pesto and Burrata Arancini Grilled Lamb Spiedini with Coal-Roasted Vegetable Purée and Pine Nut Agrodolce Ancient Grain Polenta with Wild Mushrooms and Balsamic–Game Sauce Pairing: Schramsberg Blanc de Blancs 2006 Dinner Angry Ahi Tuna Crudo with Crispy Basil, Garlic, Serrano Chilies, and Orange Pairing: Ruinart Blanc de Blancs NV Roasted Butternut Squash with Porcini, Caramelized Shallots, Burrata, and Balsamic Caviar Pairing: Chiarello Family Vineyards

Comments (0)

On the Menu: Richard Blais

Richard Blais Fans of Top Chef know Richard Blais for his hyper-modern technique and creative reinventing of classic cuisine. For tonight's unique event, the superstar chef will stay true to form, serving a menu of elegant dishes inspired by the haute hamburgers offered at his renowned Flip Burger Boutique. Here's the menu: Hors d’Oeuvre Scotch Eggs with Chorizo and Pimentón Spanish Mackerel Tartare with Passion Fruit Thai-bouleh Swedish Meatballs Chaud-Froid Pairing: Champagne Henriot Brut Souverain Dinner An Egg with Breakfast Flavors Pairing: Trimbach Cuvée Frédéric Émile Riesling 2004 Spanish Mackerel Crudo with Fried Chicken and Sesame Seed Ice Cream Pairing: Hubert Lamy Les Tremblots Puligny-Montrachet 2007 Border Spring Farms Lamb with Aromatic Yogurt and Kaffir Lime Pairing:

Comments (0)

Pages