Eye Candy: A Toast

Christian Caiazzo of Osteria Stellina celebrates with a shot in the Beard House kitchen Osteria Stellina's Christian Caiazzo and his team celebrate with shots after sending their final course out of the Beard House kitchen. See more photos of Christian Caiazzo's Beard House dinner here.

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Eye Candy: Attack of the Macaron

Citrus Macaron with Citrus Slices, Lime–Vanilla Sorbet, Lemon Curd Cream, and Blood Orange Sauce At a celebration of Steve Wynn's Las Vegas empire, Encore pastry chef Frédéric Robert Citrus served citrus macarons with citrus slices, lime–vanilla sorbet, lemon curd cream, and blood orange sauce. Check out more photos of the stunning Beard House meal.

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A Menu from James Beard's American Cookery

James Beard's American Cookery

While a lucky few have already gotten their hands on the new edition of James Beard's American Cookery (see Gael Greene's Twitter feed), mere mortals still have to wait another five days to see the repackaged classic. In the meantime, take a look at the menu served to members of the media at yesterday's Beard House lunch. Every course was lifted straight from the book's pages.

Hors d'Oeuvre: Dainty Sandwiches > Smoked Salmon with Lemon; Asparagus Tips with Mayonnaise (page 815) Luncheon: Leek and Potato Soup (page 92) Breaded Chicken Breasts (page

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Eat this Word: Wattle Seed

wattle seedWHAT? Down Under delicacy. Wattle seeds come from the pods that grow on acacia trees in Australia. A dietary staple for the continent’s aboriginal population, wattle seeds were traditionally ground into flour and baked into a flat bread. Today the Australian edibles are prized for their high nutrient content and nutty, coffee-like flavor when roasted; in fact, the seeds smell and taste so much like java that many Australians drink a beverage made from them as a caffeine-free substitute. Wattle seeds are most frequently added to desserts—they’re particularly delicious when paired with nuts and chocolate—but the possibilities for their use are endless. WHERE? Dewey LoSasso's Beard House dinner WHEN? October 30, 2010 HOW?

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On the Menu: Tutto Toscana

Feathers One of our favorite fall traditions at the Beard House is our partnership with the faculty at the Apicius International School of Hospitality, a Florence-based institution that offers Tuscan-focused culinary studies. For this year's events, the instructors will be joined by their Italian students, for whom the programming is a capstone of a six-week-long intercontinental study of gastronomy and culture. The weekend-spanning event series, Tutto Toscana, includes an Italian-style cocktail party, a Tuscan-inspired brunch, and Feathers, a food-crossed-with-fashion celebration at

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On the Menu: Scott Conant

Scott Conant at the James Beard House In 2008 Scott Conant, who rose to fame as the chef of Alto and L’Impero, made a triumphant return to the NYC dining scene with Scarpetta. Now, with the openings of Faustina and Scarpetta locations in Miami and Toronto, Conant has cemented his position as one of the most creative chefs cooking Italian food today. Conant will bring his signature blend of rustic and refined cooking to the Beard House tomorrow night. Have a look at the menu below: Hors d’Oeuvre Harvest Salad with Preserved Lemons, Root Vegetables, and Baby Greens Chilled Cauliflower Purée with Oysters and Italian Caviar Baby Potatoes with Fonduta and Truffles Pairing: De Conciliis Selim Spumante NV Dinner Pumpkin Soup Purée with Spot Prawns and Leeks Pairing: Castello di Rubbia Malvasia d’Istria 2007 Kobe Beef Tartare with Shaved Parmigiano-

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Eat This Word: Membrillo



WHAT? Jam-cestor. Derived from the Latin word melimelum, or "honey apple," the Spanish word membrillo (in Portuguese, marmelada) refers both to fresh and preserved quince, a celebrated fruit that was stored in honey during classical times. According to The Oxford Companion to Food, the thick sweet paste of cooked quince and sugar is the likely ancestor of jam and marmalade. Quince, a large, lumpy, bitter, green fruit that is inedible when raw, is transformed from ugly duckling into swan with the addition of sugar and a little heat, becoming an aromatic, delicious pink jam. In his book The Basque Kitchen, Gerald Hirigoyen describes the transformation of quince into membrillo as "magical," praising the quince, beloved in the French Pays Basque as well as along the Iberian peninsula, for its "delicate, floral, almost citrusy flavor." The paste is often served as a counterpoint to the salty flavors of Manchego cheese and Serrano and Presunto ham.

WHERE?

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Eye Candy: NYCWFF at JBF

Here are our favorite snaps from our weekend with the Food Network New York City Wine & Food Festival. We'll be posting galleries for each of the three dinners, so stay tuned!

The Food Network New York City Wine & Food Festival at the James Beard Foundation

Marcela Valladolid finishes shooters of Mexican corn soup with a morita chile gastrique during Holy Mole

The Food Network New York City Wine & Food Festival at the James Beard Foundation

Smoked Edenbrook Farm rainbow... Read more >

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On the Menu: Sunday Supper

Food Network Wine & Food Festival Sunday Supper at the James Beard Foundation

Every Italian knows that there is no meal more special than the Sunday supper, when the family comes together around the table. For our third and final partnership with the Food Network New York City Wine & Food Festival, Food Network star Anne Burell and Mark Ladner of NYC’s Del Posto, who were once co sous-chefs for Mario Batali on Iron Chef America, will join forces with Cesare Casella of New York’s Salumeria Rosi for an Italian feast that’s sure to rival grandma’s. Below, the menu:

Hors d’Oeuvre Cesare Casella Salumi Misti > Italian Cured Meats Leek Tarts Anne Burrell Parmigiano-Reggiano–

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On the Menu: A Symphony of Spice

A Symphony of Spice Saturday night's Beard House dinner, the second of our series with the Food Network Wine & Food Festival, will celebrate the rich and complex flavors of Indian cuisine. Three of the most noted names in Indian cooking—innovative chef Floyd Cardoz of New York’s Tabla, cookbook author and noted Indian cooking authority Madhur Jaffrey, and cookbook author and restaurateur Suvir Saran—have collaborated on a distinctly memorable menu of classic and modern dishes, paired with outstanding Rieslings from the Chateau Ste. Michelle portfolio. Have a look: Hors d’Oeuvre Madhur Jaffrey Dahi Aloo Poori > Chickpea and Potato–Stuffed Semolina Puffs with Yogurt and Tamarind Sauces Floyd Cardoz Goan Braised Oxtail–Ajwain Tarts Suvir Saran Tamarind-Glazed Chicken

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