Eye Candy: Bluegrass State Dessert

strawberry, Kentucky brie, and black walnut cobbler with blackberry–buttermilk ice cream and bourbon-smoked sea salt

For a preview of our partnership with the World Equestrian Games, JBF rounded up a group of Kentucky chefs for an evening of sophisticated, traditional Southern fare. The team served this strawberry, Kentucky brie, and black walnut cobbler with blackberry–buttermilk ice cream and bourbon-smoked sea salt for dessert. See more photos of the dinner here.

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On the Menu: JBF Celebrates Gay Pride on Both Coasts

gay pride flag

Each June, revelers across the country and the world celebrate Gay Pride with parades, pageantry, and parties. The James Beard House is no exception, and this month we're planning two fantastic events to honor the gay community. First there's the San Francisco Pride Soirée at 12 Gallagher Lane, where Gary Danko, Emily Luchetti, and other JBF Award–winning Bay Area stars will present a delicious walk-around tasting and cocktail party. (See the menu here.) The next night we're holding the Second Annual Gay Soirée at the historic Beard House in New York's West Village, featuring chefs from 10 Downing, the Meatball Shop,

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Eye Candy: Ceviche as Art

Eleven Madison Park's Daniel Humm, who earned four stars from the New York Times last year, served this elegant diver scallop ceviche with fennel, yuzu, and rhubarb at a Beard House dinner last month. Click here to see more photos of the stunning menu. (Looking for an easy ceviche that you can make at home? Check out Monday's recipe.)

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Eat This Word: Vacherin

The James Beard Foundation on vacherin

WHAT? A very dairy dessert. Several cow’s milk cheeses, both French and Swiss in origin, go by the name Vacherin, which contains the French word for cow, vache. Some are made specifically for fondue; others are so soft they’re eaten with a spoon. To make matters even more confusing, the word is also used for a French meringue dessert. The dessert, it’s true, was named for the cheese, which it’s said to resemble. Rings of meringue are stacked on top of one another to form a basket, which is filled with fruit and ice cream, whipped cream, or crème chantilly, and then prettily decorated.

WHEN? Jean-Marc Boyer and Cedric Tovar's Beard House Dinner

WHERE? June 30, 2010

HOW? Strawberry Vacherin

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Eye Candy: José Andrés and Co.

José Andrés with his crew James Beard Award–winning chef José Andrés and the chefs who steer his various restaurants pose for a group photo in the Beard House kitchen. The entire crew worked together to prepare a menu of Andrés's signature, forward-thinking Spanish cuisine, which was paired with Spanish wines and selections from the Glenlivet portfolio. Click here to see more photos from the evening.

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On the Menu: Lights, Camera, Eat!

Beard on Film, our yearly preview party of the NYC Food Film Festival, returns to the Beard House tomorrow night. Hosted by Harry Hawk and George Motz (pictured above), the festivities will feature trailer screenings, director discussions, and plenty of grub from local chefs, including Scott Smith and Robbie Richter, pitmasters of Rub BBQ and Fatty 'Cue, respectively. (Will the Fatty 'Cue smoked brisket sandwich, which was recently crowned best sammy in New York, make a cameo on the spread? You'll have to attend to find out.) Click here to view the epic menu and make

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Eye Candy: Masa Turnovers

At a Beard House dinner celebrating the cuisine of Oaxaca, the chefs served these tiny masa turnovers. (The Spanish word for "dough," masa is made from ground corn kernels that have been fire-dried and soaked in limewater.) To see more photos of the Oaxacan feast, click here.

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Eye Candy: Apricot Bread Pudding

A serving of apricot bread pudding gets a finishing touch of crème anglaise at the end of the Humberto Campos's Beard House dinner. Campos, who owns Lorena's in Maplewood, New Jersey, prepared a seasonally driven menu of French fare. Check out more photos here.

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Eat this Word: Sake

WHAT? For goodness, sake. Considered Japan’s national drink, sake is made by inoculating white rice with a special mould (Aspergillus oryzae), mixing it with pure water, and allowing it to ferment. It’s a process more similar to beer making than to wine making, but sake is nevertheless usually translated as "rice wine." Also like beer, sake is best drunk young—Shizuo Tsuji, author of Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art (Kodansha), says experts recommend three months of age. Sake comes graded into classes: tokkyu (special class), ikkyu (first class) and nikyu (second class), but unlike French cru classifications, these do not designate quality. What you drink your sake in depends on whether you drink it hot or cold. Cold sake is usually served in cedar boxes called masuzake, sometimes with salt. Hot sake is served in small ceramic carafes called tokkuri, and is drunk from little cups.

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Eye Candy: Incredible, Edible Eggs

A chef fries up some hen eggs at a dinner featuring UpStairs on the Square's Susan Regis, Steven Brand, Maria Santos, and Matthew Paul Reiser. You can see more photos of their dinner by clicking here.

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