Eye Candy: Peeping Tom

Tom Colicchio keeps a watchful eye over the Beard House kitchen as chefs from his various restaurants prepare a tasting menu for diners. Click here to see more photos of our celebration of the Colicchio empire.

Comments (0)

Eye Candy: Brotherly Love

The Voltaggio brothers work together to plate a course of shima aji with salsify, quinoa, and morels. You can view more photos of the Top Chef finalists' thrilling dinner by clicking here. (Click here to see our clip of Michael discussing his pigeon pastrami.)

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Kuku Sabzi

WHAT? Iranian frittata. The herbs used to make kuku sabzi symbolize rebirth and the eggs fertility, which is why this Persian omelette is traditionally eaten at Noruz, Persian New Year. The herbs (sabzi), in fact, are key to the celebration; they are one of seven traditional items-symbolizing seven guardian angels—that are part of every table setting for the New Year's feast. According to Margaret Shaida's Legendary Cuisine of Persia, kuku sabzi is the most famous and popular of the many varieties of kuku (omelette). It can be eaten hot or at room temperature. Iranians cook one side of the omelette in a frying pan, then cut it into wedges before flipping each slice to brown. When done, the outside of the kuku should be a crispy bronze, the interior tender and green from generous handfuls of cilantro, dill, mint, chives, and other herbs. Chopped barberries (a sour red

Comments (0)

Eye Candy: Savory Madeleines

savory madeleines JBF Award Winner Georges Perrier and Nicholas Elmi—both of the acclaimed Le Bec-Fin in Philadelphia—served these delicious savory madeleines at their Beard House dinner last month. Click here to see more photos from the elegant menu. (And check out the madeleine recipe here).

Comments (0)

Eye Candy: Vermicelli Panna Cotta

panna cotta For his dessert course, Kuldeep Singh of Origin India Restaurant served this vermicelli panna, topped with a layer of alphonso mango jelly. Click here to see more photos from his modern Indian Beard House dinner.

Comments (0)

Reel Food: Michael Voltaggio Talks Pigeon Pastrami

In a month full of deli delectables at the Beard House, Michael Voltaggio's interpretation of a pastrami sandwich could be the cleverest. In the video after the jump, the Top Chef winner describes the inspiration behind the dish and its components (make sure your computer's volume is up; the multitasking chef had our Kitchen Aid churning during this interview): Here's a look at the final plated dish:

Comments (0)

On the Menu: Modern Japanese

Akira Back A professional snowboarder in an earlier life, Akira Back cooks with an adventurous spirit at the swanky Yellowtail Japanese Restaurant in Las Vegas. (His training with Nobu Matsuhisa and Masaharu Morimoto gives him a pretty serious edge, too.) Chef Back will be in the Beard House kitchen this Saturday, where he will serve a dinner of traditional ingredients fused with inventive technique. Check out the menu below: Whitefish Carpaccio with Micro-Cilantro, Lime Air, and Kochujang Smoked Octopus with Edamame Coulis and White Truffle–Sesame Oil Sonoma Valley Foie Gras with Kumamoto Oyster and Korean Pear–Acacia Honey Broiled Miso Atlantic Cod with Pickled Shimeji Mushrooms, Soybean Sprouts, and Yuzu–Sake Foam Braised Kobe Beef Short Ribs with Fingerling Potatoes, Baby Carrots, and Quail Egg Green Tea Heaven > Green Tea Sponge Cake with Green Tea

Comments (0)

Giveaway: Win a Free Copy of Save the Deli (Pickles Extra)

Save the Deli With his well-seasoned website and new book, Save the Deli, David Sax has taken public his personal mission to save the taste and culture of the Jewish delicatessen. And on Monday he’s taking it to the Beard House, where he’ll preside over a dinner of elevated deli delights entitled “A Schmaltz to Remember.” New York eateries—like Ben’s Best, Second Avenue Deli, and Liebman’s—will provide some signature dishes, while New York chefs—such as Bruce Bromberg and Eric Bromberg (Blue Ribbon), Harold Moore and Snir Eng-Sela (Commerce), and George Lazi (Fig & Olive)—will riff on deli classics,

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Gefilte Fish

gefilte fishWHAT? Something fishy. Nowadays, not many dishes require you to keep live animals in your bathtub, but that’s how most traditional recipes for this Jewish delicacy begin. The live animal was usually a carp, and you kept it flapping in the tub to ensure freshness. Once the fish was killed and gutted, you removed the flesh, chopped and seasoned it, and stuffed it back into the skin to poach. (Gefilte is Yiddish for “stuffed.”) Served chilled with a little horseradish, gefilte fish was thus an appropriate dish for the Sabbath, when heating food is proscribed by Jewish law. These days, most cooks who make gefilte fish purchase already ground carp, pike, whitefish, or a combination, season it, and shape it into balls. There are two principal styles, peppery and sweet, which are said to roughly correspond to different regions of eastern European heritage—Polish Jews make their gefilte fish with extra sugar; Russian Jews use more ground pepper. Perhaps because of

Comments (0)

Eye Candy: Maine Crab Cones

crab cones Mitchell Kaldrovich of Sea Glass served these Maine crab cones with almond–bacon crumbs during the reception that preceded his New England–style Beard House dinner. See more photos from his elegant menu here.

Comments (0)

Pages