On the Menu: Modern American Grill

Carlo deMarco After apprenticing with renowned JBF Award winner Georges Perrier (Le Bec-Fin), Carlo deMarco set out on his own in the Main Line area of Philadelphia. After opening 333 Belrose and Firecreek Restaurant & Bar, he quickly attracted his own fans and accolades (including a coveted “Chef to Watch” designation from Esquire). We’ll get a taste of his contemporary American cuisine to the Beard House on Friday, March 5: Apple Trio > Apple Cider Bisque with Crisp Apple Chips; Green Apple, Bibb Lettuce, and Maytag Blue Cheese Salad with Candied Walnuts; and Chicken Livers with Spiced Apple Compote Pan-Seared Copper River Salmon with Warm Black Lentil Salad, Lobster–Tarragon Sauce, and Micro-Arugula Coffee and Macadamia–Crusted Pork Tenderloin with Slow-Roasted Yams and Mango, Lime, and Ginger Salsa Candied Bacon–Crusted Squab Breast with Anson Mills Grits, Molasses-Spiked Collard Greens, and Jus

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Eye Candy: Port Royal Shrimp Rémoulade with Fried Green Tomato Salad and Benton’s Country Ham

shrimp rémoulade Mike Davis of Terra in West Columbia, South Carolina, served this classic New Orleans shrimp rémoulade at the Beard House last month; he made the dish extra special by adding fried green tomatoes and Benton's country ham. See more photos of his Southern menu here.

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Eat this Word: Gyoza

gyoza-by-matthew-mendozaWHAT? Japanese potstickers. Like many Japanese culinary traditions—chopsticks, noodles, and soy sauce, to name a few—gyoza, or pan-fried pork dumplings, were borrowed from the Chinese. Even the Japanese name is derived from the Mandarin jiaozi. A relative newcomer, it's believed gyoza arrived in Japan sometime in the 1930s, after the Japanese invasion of China, and were popularized around the country during the 1940s. Today, the Japanese dumplings have a more heavily seasoned filling and thinner dough than their Chinese cousins. Fried on one side until crisp then steamed until tender, gyoza are one of the few non-noodle dishes found on menus in ramen shops in Japan, where they are served with a dipping sauce of soy sauce, vinegar, and sesame or chili oil. There are also gyoza restaurants. True gyoza lovers should find their way to Ikebukuro's Sunshine City complex where part of the Namco Namjatown amusement

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Eye Candy: Fabulous Focaccia

focaccia Lorenzo Polegri—chef at the famed Zeppelin in Orvieto, Italy—served these tiny cornmeal and rosemary focaccia rounds with gorgonzola mousse and chives during the reception of his Beard House dinner. You can see more photos of the Italian feast by clicking here.

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Eat this Word: Lardo

lardo-claudio-cicali WHAT? Chewing the fat. Though Corby Kummer described lardo as "heaven on bread" in a 2005 New York Times article, this porky product is actually made from the layer of fat located directly under a pig's skin, which is then seasoned and cured. For most Americans, a slice of pork fat wasn't always the most appetizing antipasto, but in recent years this delicious Italian delicacy has been winning over fans on this side of the Atlantic, thanks in part to celebrity chefs like Mario Batali, whose lardo pizza at his NYC eatery Otto has become a favorite of critics and diners alike. After all, what self-respecting carnivore can argue with paper-thin slices of seasoned, glistening, translucent fat delicately draped over pizza dough—or any other carbohydrate for that matter? But in Italy, long before it was the ingredient del giorno, lardo was traditionally peasant fare, made from the fat that remained after the pig was butchered

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Eat this Word: Scrapple

scrappleWHAT? Rehashed hog hodgepodge. Though a packed loaf of pig scraps and offal may not entice those with squeamish stomachs, scrapple has been enjoyed in the Pennsylvania Dutch region since its first settlers set up shop there. (According to the Habbersett company—which has been slinging scrapple since 1863—the product was invented in Chester County, PA, home to the state’s oldest colony.) Similar to black pudding or German panhas, scrapple was an invention born of frugality, a delicious way to use up every last piece of the pig after slaughtering. To the leftover porky parts New World pioneers added buckwheat and cornmeal—two crops indigenous to the area—and seasonings before setting in loaf-shaped molds. Sliced and fried until golden brown, scrapple has a crispy texture and well-spiced flavor similar to that of a country sausage patty. You can still find it in

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Eye Candy: Banana Bread French Toast

banana bread French toast Jason Weiner of Almond served this deluxe French toast at his Beard House brunch last month. Made with banana bread, the dish was topped with candied walnuts, dried cranberries, and malted anglaise. See more photos of chef Weiner's brunch here. (Photo by Joan Garvin)

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On the Menu: February 21 through February 27

on-the-menu-eileen-miller-2 Here’s what happening at the Beard House next week: Tuesday, February 23, 7:00 P.M. Another Taste of Perfection From its perch on the 24th floor of the Grand Pequot Tower at Foxwoods Resort Casino, Paragon lives up to its name—literally and figuratively—with Scott Mickelson’s French- and Asian-inflected cuisine. An apex of sophistication and a standard-bearer for fine-dining restaurants, Paragon reaches great heights. Wednesday, February 24, 7:00 P.M. Toujours Le Bec-Fin Georges Perrier ushered in Philadelphia’s dining renaissance when he opened his now-iconic restaurant, Le Bec-Fin, in 1970. Four decades later, with the help of extraordinarily talented executive chef Nicholas Elmi, Perrier’s

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Eye Candy: Ovaltine Kulfi

Ovaltine kulfi Pastry prodigy Pichet Ong served three desserts at our Valentine's Day dinner. One of them was this malted kulfi, which was topped with caramel popcorn, spiced chocolate sauce, and muckwa confetti. (Kulfi is India's answer to ice cream; muckwa is candied fennel seed.) See more photos of the seductive dinner here. (Photo by Bobbi Lin)

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On the Menu: 25th Anniversary of D'Artagnan

Ariane Daguin Behind every great chef is a resourceful and tireless purveyor, and many of America's best kitchens rely on D'Artagnan founder Ariane Daguin, whose valuable stock of foie gras, terrines, and other fine meat products is without peer. To celebrate her company's 25th anniversary, we've invited Daguin and a cadre of Gascon chefs to prepare a decadent Beard House tasting inspired by the D'Artagnan catalog, complete with regional wines and fine Armagnacs. Take a gander at the menu below: Hors d’Oeuvre Foie Gras and Black Truffle Tartine Chestnut Soup Laguiole Cheese Rolls with Salsify and Duck Prosciutto Wild Boar Bacon–Wrapped Prunes Dinner Creamy Tarbais Bean Soup with Black Truffles Pan-Seared Foie Gras with Caramelized Apples and Sweet-and-Sour Sauce Pigs’ Foot and Porcini Stew Hazelnut-Crusted Venison Medallion with

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