James Beard's Recipe Box: Leg of Pork with Cider and Cream

flaming the roast with applejackWelcome to our latest guest post about recipes from James Beard’s American Cookery. Today we hear from JBF Award winner and chef/owner of Paley's Place, Vitaly Paley, who prepares an homage to Beard's recipe for Leg of Pork with Cider and Cream. ( You can read an archive of

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James Beard's Recipe Box: Eggs Foo Yung

eggs foo yungWelcome to our latest guest post about recipes from James Beard’s American Cookery. Today we hear from Andrea Nguyen, author of Into the Vietnamese Kitchen. (You can read the guest post archives here.) A few weeks ago, I spent 24 hours cooking from James Beard’s American Cookery, originally published in 1972 and recently re-released with a foreword by Tom Colicchio. The classic cookbook is among my favorites, full of no-nonsense instructions, history, wisdom, and wit. Whenever I open the book, I learn something new. I was

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James Beard's Recipe Box: Old-Fashioned Rich Chicken Pie

chicken pot pieWelcome to our latest guest post about recipes from James Beard’s American Cookery. Today we hear from Cara Eisenpress and Phoebe Lapine of Big Girls Small Kitchen. (You can read the guest post archives here.) Traditional American food is not always easy to define, especially when you live in New York, where ethnic restaurants and New American cuisine arguably reign. At first we think of diner food—omelets and grilled cheese and French fries—but aren't those of French descent? Hamburgers and hotdogs, perhaps, but aren't those from Germany? On a recent trip to the Mississippi Delta, we wondered if we had struck a true

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James Beard's Recipe Box: Lebkuchen

lebkuchenWelcome to our third guest post about cooking from James Beard’s American Cookery. In this installment, JBF Award–winning journalist Rebekah Denn marks the holiday season with lebkuchen. (You can find the guest post archive here.) Like so many others, I came to lebkuchen at the Christmas table. I came sort of late. After all, as one of three observant Jews in my entire school system (the other two being my brother and sister), I was known as the girl who didn’t have a Christmas tree. My parents prefer to remember our small-town Chanukah fame as “the kids who got presents eight nights in a row.” We all have

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James Beard's Recipe Box: Snickerdoodle Cake

Snickerdoodle cakeWelcome to our third guest post about cooking from James Beard’s American Cookery. In this installment, blogger Debbie Koenig experiments with Beard's Snickerdoodle Cake. (You can find the guest post archive here.) In 1972, my baby brother was born. That’s right, I said my baby brother, as in he’s younger than me by quite a few years. Fine. Do you know what else was born in 1972, weighing nearly as much as that gurgling infant? James Beard’s American Cookery. This glorious doorstop of a cookbook includes more than 1,500 recipes and explores American home cooking in nearly encyclopedic fashion.

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James Beard's Recipe Box: Sweetbreads à la Crème

Welcome to our second guest post about cooking from James Beard’s American Cookery. In this installment, cookbook author Jennifer McLagan prepares Beard's sweetbreads à la crème. (Read our first guest post here.) sweetbreadsJust as I was packing for Paris, after having finished the first edit of my new cookbook, OddBits: What to do with the Rest, the request came: “Would you cook a recipe from James Beard’s American Cookery and blog about it?” I simply wanted to run away and not write another word. Anyone who has worked on a cookbook knows this feeling. When you finally reach the end of the project you think you never want to see your computer or kitchen again. However, I know from experience that after a week or two I'm itching to get back into the kitchen. The markets in Paris also

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James Beard's Recipe Box: Molasses Cookies

molasses cookies from James Beard's American CookeryTo celebrate yesterday's reissue of James Beard’s American Cookery, we have invited cookbook authors, food writers, and chefs to prepare one of its recipes. In the coming weeks we will publish these writers’ reflections on cooking from one of the most important works in the history of our country’s cuisine. We hope their essays inspire you to do the same. First up is freelance writer and cookbook author Lauren Chattman. Stay tuned for dispatches from Mollie Katzen, Dorie Greenspan, Jennifer McLagan, and more. – JBF Editors Just when I was thinking that it was time to fill the cookie jar with something old-fashioned for fall, James Beard’s American Cookery arrived in the mail. Paging through the book, my eye focused on page 721, a recipe for

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A Menu from James Beard's American Cookery

James Beard's American Cookery

While a lucky few have already gotten their hands on the new edition of James Beard's American Cookery (see Gael Greene's Twitter feed), mere mortals still have to wait another five days to see the repackaged classic. In the meantime, take a look at the menu served to members of the media at yesterday's Beard House lunch. Every course was lifted straight from the book's pages.

Hors d'Oeuvre: Dainty Sandwiches > Smoked Salmon with Lemon; Asparagus Tips with Mayonnaise (page 815) Luncheon: Leek and Potato Soup (page 92) Breaded Chicken Breasts (page

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Recipe: James Beard's Brussels Sprouts and Chestnuts

brussels sproutsThis unfussy recipe comes from the pages of James Beard's American Cookery. Beard recommends serving this as a side for Thanksgiving dinner, describing it as "an extraordinarily good combination and one which nowadays is very easy to prepare." The ingredient list is concise and the method brief, so prepping and preparation won't disrupt that strict holiday cooking timeline you've probably already plotted. Beard, never one to oppose ramped up flavor, endorses generous extra butter and parsley at the finish.

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Recipe: James Beard's Brussels Sprouts and Chestnuts

brussels sproutsThis unfussy recipe comes from the pages of James Beard's American Cookery. Beard recommends serving this as a side for Thanksgiving dinner, describing it as "an extraordinarily good combination and one which nowadays is very easy to prepare." The ingredient list is concise and the method brief, so prepping and preparation won't disrupt that strict holiday cooking timeline you've probably already plotted. Beard, never one to oppose ramped up flavor, endorses generous extra butter and parsley at the finish.

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