Super Bowl Recipe: Linton Hopkins's Shrimp Rillettes

shrimp rillettes

Your football buddies might raise an eyebrow if you serve this oh-so-French-sounding spread from Atlanta-based chef Linton Hopkins at your Super Bowl party. But once they get a taste of the sweet shrimp paste that's been whipped with cayenne pepper and a generous dose of butter, they'll be parked by the ramekin for the rest of the game, alternating between rillettes-slathered chips and slugs of all-American lager. Get the recipe here.

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What We Loved in 2010

Curtis Duffy's dish at the James Beard Awards; Karen DeMasco's budino at Chefs & Champagne
 

The JBF editors collectively checked in at hundreds of restaurants and events in 2010; here are a dozen dishes that made us sit up and pay attention (and lick our plates clean):

Curtis Duffy's Alaskan King Crab with Cucumber Consommé, Kalamansi, Floral Cream, and Lemon Balm at the James Beard Awards
The ingredient list reads like a perfume label, but there was nothing overpowering about this dish: the aromatics perfectly complemented the creamy chunks of crab. We also loved the Grant Achatz protégé’s artful presentation.

Linton Hopkin's Roast... Read more >

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On the Menu: May 2 through May 8

Here’s what’s happening at the Beard House and around the country next week: Sunday, May 2, 6:00 P.M. 2010 James Beard Foundation Media & Book Awards To welcome the James Beard Foundation Book Awards to our annual Media Awards dinner and ceremony, this year’s Chefs have been selected not only for their culinary accomplishments but also for their literary prowess. In addition to their talents behind the stove, each of our chefs is a respected cookbook author who has shared his or her culinary secrets with an eager reading (and cooking) audience. Monday, May 3, 6:00 P.M. 2010 James Beard Foundation Awards Ceremony and Gala Reception The culinary industry is built on a tradition of mentorship – a

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Eat this Word: Fiddleheads

WHAT? Fern believers. A seasonal green available for only about two weeks in spring, fiddleheads are actually the young, tender shoots of "cinnamon," "brake," or "ostrich" ferns. The tightly coiled, immature fronds can be eaten raw or gently cooked, and have a taste likened to a cross between asparagus, green beans, and okra. The shape of the coil echoes the shape of the scroll of a violin or fiddle, hence the name. The season is over once the fiddleheads uncoil into full-fledged fronds. WHERE? Linton Hopkins's Beard House dinner WHEN? May 5, 2010 HOW? Hickory-Smoked Pepper-Crusted Rib-Eye and Braised Short Ribs with Appalachian Ramps,

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