JBF Trip Planner: New Orleans

Anna Mowry on where to eat in New Orleans

 

If you’re anything like us, the first thing you do when planning a trip—perhaps even before booking a plane ticket—is figure out where you’re going to eat while you’re there. Museums, sightseeing, and shopping are all well and good, but food is often the main attraction. To make trip planning a little easier, we’re compiling lists of our can’t-miss pit stops in some of our favorite places. JBF Award winners, hole-in-the-wall favorites, America’s Classics, and one-hit wonders—we’ll give you a quick rundown of our absolute must-eats in each featured location.

 

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New Orleans is currently sitting on a culinary sweet spot: the city’s signatures—beastly oysters, savory muffalettas, beignets as big as whoopee cushions—are as plentiful and as tempting as ever, while a new wave of seasonal, farm-cozy spots... Read more >

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Talking Trust and Sustainability in New Orleans

 

In preparation for our 2012 JBF Food Conference, A Crisis in Confidence: Creating a Better, More Sustainable Food World We Can Trust, we're holding regional salons around the country to discuss the notion of trust in our food system. Our conference season officially kicked off this spring in Charleston, and then moved to New Orleans this summer, where we met with a diverse group of 18 insightful chefs, farmers, restaurateurs, educators, and other members of the local food community at Palace Café. We chatted with JBF executive vice president Mitchell Davis (who facilitates the salons along with food system consultant Karen Karp of Karp Resources) and he filled us in on the conversation.

 

JBF: Can you tell us a bit about why... Read more >

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Recipe: Satsuma Pot-de-Crème

Satsuma Pot-de-Crème Smooth and sensual, custard-based desserts rightfully belong on any Valentine's Day menu. You'll certainly want this unique and elegant pot-de-crème from New Orleans's Café Adelaide on yours. Chef Chris Lusk sweetens it with satsuma, a delicate Japanese orange that came to Louisiana in the 18th century. In addition to cream, Lusk uses Calpico, a milky, yogurt-flavored drink from Japan, which enriches the custard's tangy flavor. Get the recipe here.

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