Even More Pie: Pascale's Picks

Thanksgiving pie
When we were researching regional American pies for our Thanksgiving pie story, we called up Pascale Le Draoulec, author of American Pie: Slices of Life (and Pie) from America’s Back Roads, to find out her favorite slices across the country. Here's what she told us.

1. Apple–blueberry pie from Mammy’s Cupboard in Natchez, MS
“An amazing pie that sat high on its haunches and came with a bittersweet story, too.”

2. The late Emma Duarte’s olallieberry pie at Duarte’s Tavern in Pescadero, CA
“A slice of this pie after a bowl of their famous artichoke soup, and you’re a changed person.”

3. Laura Hansen’s huckleberry–peach pie from Loula’s Cafe in Whitefish, MT
“Laura

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Thanksgiving Pie: A New Way to Slice It

Thanksgiving pie

“We Americans undoubtedly eat more kinds of pie than any other country,” James Beard wrote in 1979. Early Americans baked sweet and savory pies in round, shallow pans as a way to stretch basic ingredients like flour and lard. The dish was such a staple that most settlers ate it at every meal.

Oh, how times have changed. These days most of us eat pie only once a year—on Thanksgiving—and we tend to stick to our family’s favorite kind, which is almost invariably one of three varieties: apple, pumpkin, or pecan.

This year, why not shake things up a bit around the holiday table by experimenting with a different kind of pie? For inspiration, look no further than these regional American pie-making traditions.


New England: Boiled Cider Pie
Although English recipes for apple pie go

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Recipe: Tarte Tatin with Goat Cheese Cheesecake

goat-tarte For a riff on apple pie, Joseph Bonaparte served a tarte tatin with goat cheese cheesecake at the Beard House's Thanksgiving dinner. Though the day of the turkey has come and gone, we're still facing a long winter of farmers' markets with little more than apples for their wares—this delicious dish makes the best of the fruit.

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Wine Wisdom: Tyler Colman's Thanksgiving Picks

wine glass Your turkey is bobbing in brine, you've devised a hard-and-fast schedule for your oven and stovetop, and you've struck the last ingredient off the grocery list—every minutia of your cooking game plan is nailed down, but what about the wine? With so much emphasis weighing on what to eat on Thanksgiving, it's no surprise that pairings can get second billing. Fortunately, we've sought help from our friend Tyler Colman, wine expert and author of A Year of Wine: Perfect Pairings, Great Buys, and What to Sip for Each Season and his Dr. Vino blog. As we learned from his Beard on Books appearance, Colman believes that occasion, setting, and company ought to be taken into greater account when choosing a wine. So what does this mean for Thanksgiving? "Pairing wines with Thanksgiving is hard because of

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