Beverage Wisdom: Thanksgiving Brews from Colin Alevras

Rumor has it that the Mayflower was originally bound for Georgia but ended up docking at Plymouth Rock because the ship had run out of beer. Colin Alevras, the beverage director at David Chang’s Momofuku and Má Pêche, thinks the Pilgrims had their priorities straight. Below, he explains why beer is a perfect match for the Thanksgiving meal.

 

Before you get suckered into drinking some mass-produced Beaujolais Nouveau swill for the holidays, don’t forget about beverages other than wine for your Thanksgiving dinner. The nature of this holiday meal itself—long, varied, and tethering back and forth between sweet and savory—calls for beverages that are low in alcohol content and versatile enough to be paired with a wide selection of food. Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you beer: an excellent beverage choice for your next Thanksgiving.

 

Beer has just as much variety in flavors and textures as wine. With the recent resurgence of microbreweries, it’s easy to access great local, regional, and heritage beers. Beer is also affordable, a bonus during the indulgences of the holiday season.

 

The kinds of beer that come to mind for the... Read more >

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Thanksgiving Beers with Momofuku's Colin Alevras

Thanksgiving Brews from Colin Alevras Since we've already covered which wines to drink with Thanksgiving, we called up Colin Alevras, beverage director of Momofuku group and the brains behind the beer program at DBGB, to tell us which suds to enjoy with your Turkey Day spread.

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Even More Pie: Pascale's Picks

Thanksgiving pie
When we were researching regional American pies for our Thanksgiving pie story, we called up Pascale Le Draoulec, author of American Pie: Slices of Life (and Pie) from America’s Back Roads, to find out her favorite slices across the country. Here's what she told us.

1. Apple–blueberry pie from Mammy’s Cupboard in Natchez, MS
“An amazing pie that sat high on its haunches and came with a bittersweet story, too.”

2. The late Emma Duarte’s olallieberry pie at Duarte’s Tavern in Pescadero, CA
“A slice of this pie after a bowl of their famous artichoke soup, and you’re a changed person.”

3. Laura Hansen’s huckleberry–peach pie from Loula’s Cafe in Whitefish, MT
“Laura

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Thanksgiving Pie: A New Way to Slice It

Thanksgiving pie

“We Americans undoubtedly eat more kinds of pie than any other country,” James Beard wrote in 1979. Early Americans baked sweet and savory pies in round, shallow pans as a way to stretch basic ingredients like flour and lard. The dish was such a staple that most settlers ate it at every meal.

Oh, how times have changed. These days most of us eat pie only once a year—on Thanksgiving—and we tend to stick to our family’s favorite kind, which is almost invariably one of three varieties: apple, pumpkin, or pecan.

This year, why not shake things up a bit around the holiday table by experimenting with a different kind of pie? For inspiration, look no further than these regional American pie-making traditions.


New England: Boiled Cider Pie
Although English recipes for apple pie go

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Recipe: Tarte Tatin with Goat Cheese Cheesecake

goat-tarte For a riff on apple pie, Joseph Bonaparte served a tarte tatin with goat cheese cheesecake at the Beard House's Thanksgiving dinner. Though the day of the turkey has come and gone, we're still facing a long winter of farmers' markets with little more than apples for their wares—this delicious dish makes the best of the fruit.

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