Eye Candy: The Boar Hunt in the Greenhouse Gallery

Brad FarmerieLocated where diners meet and mingle before meals, the Greenhouse Gallery at the Beard House exhibits the works of up-and-coming and established artists who work with culinary themes. Currently on display is The Boar Hunt, a photo series by Peter Frank Edwards that documents the hunting, butchering, and cooking of a wild boar in the wilderness of South Carolina's Santee River Delta. "The premise was to get a great chef and put him with some great hunters and let them learn and experience different things from each other," says Edwards. The great chef? Brad Farmerie of NYC's Public, Double Crown, and the Monday Room. "Brad has a passion for pork, but had never hunted and harvested a pig," says Edwards. "We had a great and challenging time working on the project together. Chest-deep swamp water, long hikes through the swamp, listening for the pigs." The work was commissioned by Men's

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Eat this Word: Rillettes [ree-YEHT]

RillettesWHAT? Coveted crock. "I certainly had never had the happiness of seeing that brown mess spread on slices of bread and butter," recalled Honoré de Balzac of watching his schoolmates eat the savory spread he so desired. A native of Tours, the French literary legend may have belonged to one of the few families that couldn't afford the humble specialty of the region, where the fatty favorite is lovingly referred to as "brown jam." As with other pâtés and terrines, rillettes begin with chopped meat, salted and cooked slowly in fat (the recipe dates back to the 15th century Loire Valley, where it was likely created to use up leftover scraps of pork). The tender morsels are then shredded and stored in ramekins or crocks covered with additional fat. This age-old technique results in a rustic yet deliciously creamy paste that has aromas of garlic, bay leaf, thyme, and wine. Literally translated, rillettes means "plank," which probably refers to its appearance when

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