Recipe Roundup: Cooking for a Crowd

Joanne Bondy's farmer's macaroni and cheese

 

It's been two weeks since Hurricane Sandy touched down in New York and New Jersey, but many of the hardest hit communities are still reeling. For those of us who live nearby and want to help, providing food to those without power or running water is a great way to get involved. Most FEMA and community-organized relief sites will accept donations of homemade food, and hot meals are particularly appreciated. Here are a few of the recipes we turn to when cooking for a crowd:

 

Baked Orzo with Eggplant and Mozzarella [Smitten Kitchen]

Adapted from a recipe by vegetable maestro Yotam Ottolenghi, this hearty yet not-too-heavy baked pasta is perked up with a pinch of lemon zest and pillowy bites of fried eggplant. Canned tomatoes can be substituted for fresh when out of season.

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Recipe Roundup: A North Carolina–Style Barbecue

 

Here's how to throw the best party of the summer: Buy a massive cut of pork shoulder and fire up your grill. Rub the pork with dry spices and cook it nice and slow over smoldering charcoal all day long. In the meantime, make a mess of sides and a sweet, biscuit-topped fruit cobbler. Invite the neighbors over. Don't forget the beer.

 

Pulled Pork

Ted Allen loves a slow-cooked pork shoulder, particularly when the tender meat is shredded, slathered with a vinegary, western North Carolina-inspired sauce, and piled high onto toasted buns.

 

Pickled Mustard Greens

Pickled greens? Yes and yes. Though minced cabbage is a more traditional accompaniment to this type of regional barbecue, these sweet-and-sour greens really cut through the rich, fatty pulled pork.

 

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Recipe: Elizabeth Karmel's White Corn Pudding

White Corn Pudding In this custardy corn pudding from Elizabeth Karmel of New York's Hill Country, puréed sweet corn is spiked with spices and thickened with cheeses to make a sinfully rich side that will stand its ground next to any bite of brawny barbecue. Chef Karmel prefers frozen shoepeg corn, a mild cultivar that's named after the tiny wooden pegs that were once used to attach shoe soles to uppers. If you can't find it, any corn in your local frozen-food aisle will work fine. Get the recipe here, or try the dish at Saturday's Chefs & Champagne® New York.

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