Recipe: Cheerwine-Boiled Peanuts

 

We know that Southern-food enthusiasts tend to raise an eyebrow at inauthentic renditions of the region's specialties, but we think they might make an exception for Marc Jacksina's updated take on the classic Southern snack of boiled peanuts. The Charlotte-based chef gently boils raw, unshelled peanuts in water that's flavored with star anise and briny kombu. Then he strips off their shells and cooks them in a sweet concoction of mirin, white soy sauce, Tabasco, and Cheerwine, a beloved cherry-flavored soda from North Carolina. The result is an addictive snack that's equal parts sweet, salty, and savory—and completely irresistible to even the most steadfast purists.

 

Get the recipe here.

Comments (0)

The Bookshelf: The Lee Bros. Simple Fresh Southern: Knockout Dishes with Down-Home Flavor

Simple Fresh Southern After winning the 2007 JBF Award for Cookbook of the Year for the Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook, Matt and Ted Lee have returned with Simple, Fresh, Southern: Knockout Dishes with Down-Home Flavor, a compilation of unfussy recipes for the busy cook. We invited the Lee Brothers to discuss their new title and Southern cuisine at last week's Beard on Books. When developing recipes for Simple, Fresh Southern, Matt and Ted found inspiration in their sprawling cookbook collection. Certain concepts emerged from serious meditation on a single ingredient, like buttermilk; others, like pimento cheese potato gratin and mint julep panna cotta, “hit like a thundercloud." Simple, Fresh Southern finds its balance between Southern food homage and the Lee brothers

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Boiled Peanuts

Boiled PeanutsWHAT? Dixie Dorito. With their quirky Lee Bros. Boiled Peanuts Catalogue, Matt and Ted Lee brought this Deep South treat to the attention of New Yorkers about a decade ago. The Lee Bros. catalogue, which can be found online at www.boiledpeanuts.com, offers lots of tips about the snack, not to mention an “I brake for boiled peanuts” T-shirt. Their peanuts, the siblings promise, “are guaranteed to turn any party into a cultural event.” To make the snack, raw unshelled peanuts (either fresh “green” or dry) are boiled in salted water for as much as two hours. The resulting snack is closer to edamame than to roasted peanuts, and, like edamame, is eaten by popping open the shell and slurping the peanut and salty brine. In many parts of the south, boiled peanuts are sold as a roadside snack. In Hoppin’ John’s Lowcountry Cooking, Southern food expert John Martin Taylor wrote, “No one knows the origin of our singular treat, but to

Comments (0)