Soup Weather

 

When the temperature is in the negative digits and the snowfall is downright apocalyptic (we're looking at you, Boston), the only thing to do is stay home and make soup. It's a cliché for a reason: nobody's craving a smoothie this time of year. We want warm, comforting bowls of clam chowder or lentils, spicy chicken broth or bourbon-laced onion soup. Make these dishes now—it's going to be a while before those snowbanks melt.

 

Thomas Keller's Clam Chowder with Bacon

Lentil Soup with Chard and Lemon

Sopa Azteca (Tortilla Soup) from Rick Bayless

French Onion and Mushroom Soup with Bourbon and Swiss Cheese

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Happy Hour: The Hooker

The Hooker cocktail

 

A jilted John Lee Hooker comforted himself with “one bourbon, one scotch, one beer.” Those wanting a more efficient consolation should seek out this marvelous cocktail by mixologist Jamie Boudreau from Seattle's acclaimed Canon. “It came about as John Lee Hooker's song came on the sound system. It made me realize that I hadn't heard of or seen a cocktail with bourbon, scotch and beer as ingredients, so I set about to make one. Surprisingly it became very popular.” Can't make it to the Pacific Northwest? Don't fret: we've got the recipe right here.

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Recipe: French Onion and Mushroom Soup with Bourbon and Swiss Cheese

French Onion and Mushroom Soup with Bourbon and Swiss Cheese

At first glance, chef J. J. Kingery's version of French onion soup appears to be run-of-the-mill bistro fare. But there are some surprises lurking underneath that crunchy and golden blanket of cheese, like earthy mushrooms that have been cooked in sherry, as well as a generous splash of bourbon. Get the recipe here.

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Q & A with JBF Award Winner Julian P. Van Winkle III

Anna Mowry interviews Julian P. Van Winkle III, winner of the 2011 JBF Award for Outstanding Wine and Spirits Professional
Winner of the 2011 JBF Award for Outstanding Wine and Spirits Professional, Julian P. Van Winkle III carries on a century-long tradition of producing premium bourbon at Old Rip Van Winkle Distillery in Louisville, Kentucky.

The James Beard Foundation: Rip Van Winkle is a four-generation family company. How did you get involved in the business?

Julian P. Van Winkle: I started working for my dad in 1977. At that time we were selling just one age of Old Rip Van Winkle. We also sold decanters filled with our whiskey. I took over the company in 1981 after my father passed away.

JBF: Can you describe your bourbon recipe and the impact it has on the flavor of your products?

JPVW: Bourbon must be made from at least 51 percent corn. Rye or wheat can also be used. My

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