The Bookshelf: Canal House Cooking

Anna Mowry reports on the debut of the Canal House Cooking series

As we first turned the pages of the winter and holiday issue of Canal House Cooking—the second volume by former Saveur staffers Melissa Hamilton and Christopher Hirsheimer—we were struck by its approachability: an apple pie with an eroding crust, basking in mellow, natural light; red peppers blackening on a flecked and splattered stove top. As the authors write in their introduction, Canal House Cooking is “home cooking by home cooks for home cooks.”

“We are used to styling and shooting food for cookbooks, but when we shoot for ourselves we are quite loose about it,” said Hirsheimer via email. “There is an authenticity about the images because that is what is going on—you are seeing things in real time.”

There is an intimacy to the book as

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The Bookshelf: Joan Krellenstein and Barbara Winkler's NYC Restaurant Picks

New York CooksYesterday we featured Joan Krellenstein and Barbara Winkler’s new cookbook, New York Cooks: 100 Recipes from the City’s Best Chefs, as well as the recipe for Joey Campanaro’s Gravy Meatball Sliders. As promised, today we’ve got the authors go-to New York City restaurants for any occasion.

Joan Krellenstein Special occasion: There's no "haute" better than Terrance Brennan's Picholine. Sunday brunch:

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The Bookshelf: Joan Krellenstein and Barbara Winkler's NYC Restaurant Picks

New York CooksYesterday we featured Joan Krellenstein and Barbara Winkler’s new cookbook, New York Cooks: 100 Recipes from the City’s Best Chefs, as well as the recipe for Joey Campanaro’s Gravy Meatball Sliders. As promised, today we’ve got the authors go-to New York City restaurants for any occasion.

Joan Krellenstein Special occasion: There's no "haute" better than Terrance Brennan's Picholine. Sunday brunch:

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The Bookshelf: New York Cooks (with recipe!)

New York CooksNew York City's restaurant scene moves at a breakneck speed, a fact not unnoticed by Joan Krellenstein and Barbara Winkler, who recently published New York Cooks: 100 Recipes from the City's Best Chefs. In the introduction the authors acknowledge that by the time the book would hit stores earlier this month, a few of its featured chefs will have moved on, some leading other kitchens, others traveling in search of inspiration. It's a realistic admission that rings with greater solemnity in light of the recent spate of restaurant closings we've seen in this industry that often seems unstoppable. It's also what makes this cookbook feel so special: Krellenstein and Winkler have given us a time capsule that captures the enduring spirit, resolve, and creativity of our city's chefs—proof

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