JBF on the Air: Allen Salkin

Allen Salkin on Taste Matters

 

On last week's episode of Taste Matters, JBF's Mitchell Davis invited author and former New York Times reporter Allen Salkin to join him in Heritage Radio Network's Brooklyn studios. He recently penned the book From Scratch: Inside the Food Network, a behind-the-scenes look at the big personalities, high drama, and cultural juggernaut of the famed television network. Allen filled Mitchell in on his writing process and provided a glimpse into the company's fascinating roller-coaster ride from chaos to conquest. Click here to listen to the full episode.

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JBF on the Air: Gabriella Gershenson

Gabriella Gershenson on Taste Matters with Mitchell Davis

 

On yesterday’s episode of Taste Matters, Gabriella Gershenson joined JBF’s Mitchell Davis in the studio to talk about her latest gig as food writer and editor for Every Day with Rachael Ray magazine. She talks about the evolution of food television and the magazine’s goal of creating a fun, easy read that appeals to home cooks. Her writing also appears in The New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, The Boston Globe, Edible Manhattan, and several other publications. She also appears as a judge on the Food Network’s 24 Hour Restaurant Battle. Listen below to learn about Every Day with Rachael Ray’s upcoming September issue, her favorite cannoli recipe, and the restaurants on Gabriella’s radar:

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The Bookshelf: Julia Child's The French Chef

Julia Child's The French Chef

Now that we inhabit a supersaturated food-media world of flawless camera-ready meals, secret ingredients, and down-to-the buzzer cooking, it's no surprise that the pioneers of the genre can be overshadowed by their flashier descendents. So when Dana Polan, professor of cinema studies at New York University, came by last week's Beard on Books to discuss his latest book, Julia Child's The French Chef, we asked him some questions about Child, her groundbreaking cooking show, and the evolution of the medium.   James Beard Foundation: You write that viewers of food television in the 1960s, which was a very volatile era, took comfort in the predictability of cooking shows. Today’s food shows are more suspenseful; we don’t know if the contestants on Chopped will actually finish the dish. What

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