Recipe Roundup: Hibernation Food

Lamb Stew with Parsnips, Bacon, and Fennel

 

As the Longest Winter That Ever Was continues its icy reign throughout much of the country, we're spending a lot of time indoors. We mean: A LOT. And what better way to while away these seemingly endless dark and dreary days than by cooking up a (proverbial, please) storm? These five hibernation-friendly dishes are giving us the will to hang on until spring:

 

 

Lamb Stew with Parsnips, Bacon, and Fennel [JBF]

Serve this hearty, satisfying stew with spaetzle or egg noodles tossed with butter and parsley.

 

Morning Bread Pudding with Salted Caramel [Smitten Kitchen]

Not only will this cross between French toast casserole and tarte tatin give you a reason to get up in the morning, but it's also super easy to... Read more >

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Recipes from the Best of the Best: Judy Rodgers's Peach and Raspberry Gratin with Noyaux Cream

Peach and Raspberry Gratin with Noyaux Cream

Here's a recipe from our 2004 Outstanding Chef Award winner, Judy Rodgers, to keep on hand for summer: a sweet and tart gratin of peaches and raspberries, topped with bread crumbs soaked in brown butter. In a typical show of ingenuity, Rodgers breaks open peach pits to retrieve the inner kernels (noyaux in French), which she uses to infuse cream with silky, almond-like flavor. Is it July yet? Get the recipe here.


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In spring of 2012, JBF will publish The James Beard Foundation’s Best of the Best: A 25th Anniversary... Read more >

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In Season: Cranberry Beans

cranberry beans

Also known as borlotti, pink-flecked cranberry beans are available fresh in the late summer and fall. Creamy and flavorful, they’re delicious in soups or stews or can be tossed with olive oil and herbs for a simple side dish (though they lose their gorgeous coloring once cooked). If fresh cranberry beans are no longer available in your area, buy dried ones and soak overnight before cooking. How to Store: Fresh, unshelled cranberry beans can be stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for three to four days. Dried cranberry beans stored in a cool, dry area will keep for up to a year. How to Cook: Fresh cranberry beans are very easy to shuck. One pound of beans in the pod yields about 1 1/3 cups shucked beans, or enough for about two to three people. To cook, shell the beans and put them in a medium saucepan. Cover with cold water, bring to a boil, and cook until tender, about 20 to 25 minutes. To cook dried cranberry beans, soak

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