Eat This Word: Angelica


WHAT? The "heavenly" herb. Native to northern Europe and Syria, and now grown in the damp meadows of Central Europe, America, and Asia, sweet angelica is a member of the parsley family. The tall, leafy plant has a hollow stem and grows as high as nine feet. In dessert and pastry making, the pale green, celery-like stalks may be candied (which turns them a neon green) and used as decorations. The roots and seeds are used to flavor sweet wines and liqueurs such as Benedictine and Chartreuse. But the monks were not the first to be convinced of angelica's divine powers. It is said that the Archangel Raphael revealed to a pious hermit that the "herb of the angels" was a remedy against the plague.

WHERE? Lenox Luxe


WHEN? Tuesday, November 10, 2015

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What We're Reading: August 17, 2015


The history of the humble hamburger, an American classic. [FWF


Ditch your mixing bowl: make whipped cream in a mason jar. [The Kitchn


Food52 weighs in on the “spirit cocktails” of top food media companies. [Food52


Could powdered food be the answer to world hunger? [Mental Floss


A new study reveals that... Read more >

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What We're Reading: July 30, 2015


It’s about thyme: Lebanese mixologists infuse their beer and cocktails with fresh herbs. [NPR]


Could pre-gaming with pear juice prevent a hangover nightmare? [MUNCHIES]


“What’s up, Doc?” Celebrate your favorite cartoon bunny’s birthday with recipes chock-full of beta-carotene. [Food & Wine]


Not so fresh anymore: Chipotle has dethroned Subway as the "healthy" fast-food chain of choice. [... Read more >

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What We're Reading: April 21, 2015


The celebrated Tartine Bakery is expanding nationally and globally, with planned locations in Los Angeles, New York City, and Toyko. [NYT


In the future, our soup may be cooked by robots. [NPR


What makes 350 degrees the magic number for most baking recipes? [The Kitchn


How did we all get addicted to food porn? [... Read more >

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Roasting: Our Favorite Way to Cook in Winter


Roasting is our go-to cooking method during the colder months. A hot oven, a generous pour of olive oil, and a sprinkling of salt is all you need to produce simple but spectacular dishes. But with a little bit of finesse, the technique can also yield sophisticated results, as in the following recipes:


Roasted Clams with Herb Jam and Chorizo Butter

Slices of crusty bread provide a bed for the clams in the roasting pan, and are perfect for sopping up the paprika-spiked chorizo butter.


Roasted Pineapple with Prosciutto

A welcome alternative to prosciutto-and-melon, this playful appetizer is made with a pineapple that's been roasted whole.


Smothered Pork Roast

This tender pork shoulder... Read more >

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Test Your Eat-Q: Healthy Herbs and Spices

These seasonings do more than just pump up your food's flavor. Match these spice-rack staples with their health benefits!




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Recipe Roundup: Herb-Enhanced Desserts


Fresh herbs can lend desserts a subtle aromatic note that completely transforms the dish. Here are a few of our favorite herb-enhanced sweets.


Basil-Peach Sorbet

The perfect ending to a summer meal, this subtle sorbet is made with sweet, ripe peaches and a basil-infused simple syrup.


Chocolate-Rosemary Bombolini

Bombolini are essentially Italian doughnut holes. This version from chef Matt Kelley is filled with a rich, rosemary-scented chocolate ganache.


Chilled Watermelon Soup with Mint and Ginger

The classic combination of watermelon and mint is enlivened with a touch of ginger in this refreshing, sweet soup from Carla Pellegrino.... Read more >

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Eye Candy: Glorious Heirlooms

vegetables Portioned heirloom vegetables sit on a sheet pan before being plated as simple summer salads with garnishes of herbs and goat's-milk curd. The dish appeared on a Beard House menu prepared by the Aussie celebrity chef Adrian Richardson. Have a look at more photos here.

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