Cooking with Sea Vegetables


Offering a hint of their briny habitat without tasting distinctly fishy, sea vegetables (aka seaweed) infuse dishes with deep, savory flavor. Some of the most commonly consumed varieties include nori (the seaweed used to make sushi), wakame or alaria (the soft, shredded greens often found in miso soup), or black, crunchy hijiki, which adds texture to seaweed salads and stir-fries. Sea vegetables are most commonly sold in dried form, but they’re very easy to work with. Simply soak in water until soft, then chop and add to your dish. Some seaweeds, like nori, which is used to make sushi, and dulse, are usually eaten dried.


Though they're a longtime staple of many Asian cuisines, seaweeds can also enhance foods from other parts of the world: try cooking dried beans with alaria, or sprinkle dulse flakes over puff pastry, as Dorie Greenspan does in the French-inspired pinwheel recipe listed below.


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What We're Reading: March 24, 2015


Facing down that pile of kumquats you grabbed at the farmer’s market? Add some zest to your diet with one of these recipes. [Food 52


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Toss out your balsamic and discover how sherry vinegar can revolutionize your cooking. [Serious Eats


From banana–curry to emu–kangaroo, there seem to be no rules when it comes to pizza toppings across the globe. [FWF


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