Daily Digest: January 27, 2014

Spam

 

Spam is one of the most coveted food products in South Korea. [NYT]

 

The potato lobby pressures the USDA to include white potatoes in one of its food assistance programs. [Food Politics

 

Pig virus kills off one million piglets. How will this affect our bacon? [NPR]

 

New cookie dough and marshmallow crispy Oreo flavors are on the way. [LAT]

 

Fifteen potato chip flavors that ought to be available in America. [... Read more >

Comments (0)

Reel Food: Wüsthof Butchering Demonstration

Did this morning's grilling Q & A put you in a carnivorous mood? Get a fix from this video of our recent whole-hog butchering demonstration, performed by Joshua Applestone of Fleisher's in Kingston, NY. (Julie Powell fans may recognize the Fleisher's name—it's where she honed her butchering chops in her latest book, Cleaving.) Though Applestone is said to be able to break down whole beasts in 44 seconds or less, he slowed down the pace for this Wüsthof-hosted Beard House event. Check out his mad skills after the jump!

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Scrapple

scrappleWHAT? Rehashed hog hodgepodge. Though a packed loaf of pig scraps and offal may not entice those with squeamish stomachs, scrapple has been enjoyed in the Pennsylvania Dutch region since its first settlers set up shop there. (According to the Habbersett company—which has been slinging scrapple since 1863—the product was invented in Chester County, PA, home to the state’s oldest colony.) Similar to black pudding or German panhas, scrapple was an invention born of frugality, a delicious way to use up every last piece of the pig after slaughtering. To the leftover porky parts New World pioneers added buckwheat and cornmeal—two crops indigenous to the area—and seasonings before setting in loaf-shaped molds. Sliced and fried until golden brown, scrapple has a crispy texture and well-spiced flavor similar to that of a country sausage patty. You can still find it in

Comments (0)

Reel Food: Will Gilson Breaks It Down—Pig, That Is.

Last week Cambridge chef Will Gilson served us a "farmers' market–fed pig tasting" using two pigs he raised specifically for his Beard House dinner (he also went deep-sea fishing to collect lobster off the Massachusetts shore for his corn and lobster succotash—that's a dedicated locavore!). In the video below, Gilson gives a tour of the dish.

Comments (0)