Eye Candy: Bone-In Pork Belly with Celeriac Mousseline, Oyster Mushrooms, and Cured Duck Yolks

Photo by Jeff Gurwin


At CRāVing in upstate New York, chef Adam Goetz makes the most of every single ingredient: he carefully preserves each season’s harvest, turns milk from a nearby dairy into cheese, makes his own charcuterie, and practices whole-animal butchery to round off his extensive local pantry. So it’s no surprise that at his recent Beard House dinner Goetz served a menu that truly honored and highlighted the flavors of the Empire State’s remarkable bounty. With dishes like mortadella-stuffed agnolotti and milk-fed veal carpaccio with black pepper–olive oil croutons, guests were treated to an evening full of impeccable farm-inspired fare. A fan favorite of the night was the cured, smoked, and braised bone-in pork belly from T-Meadow Farm. The luscious, tender pork belly was matched with a creamy celeriac mousseline, earthy mushrooms, a tangy kale stem... Read more >

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Watermelon: Sweet and Savory

Bay Scallop Ceviche with Watermelon and Black Sesame


Though it's most often eaten on its own—cold, sliced, no recipe needed—watermelon can be a refreshing counterpoint to strong flavors like mint and ginger, tart lime, and even spicy, marinated pork belly.


Bay Scallop Ceviche with Watermelon and Black Sesame

Festive and flavorful, this no-cook dish will help you keep cool during the season's final heat wave.


Chilled Watermelon Soup with Mint and Ginger

Serve this vermilion-hued soup as a palate cleanser, appetizer, or even dessert.


Zak Pelaccio's Pork and Watermelon Salad... Read more >

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Recipe: Mâche Salad with Pork Belly Lardons, Crispy Capers, Pine Nuts, and Plum Agrodolce Dressing

Mâche Salad


In the American salad bowl, mâche, known also as lamb's lettuce, is often left out of the mix. A variety of longstanding popularity in France, it has a tender, velvety texture and sweet, nutty flavor. Mâche lends itself easily to the autumn salad, without coercing or massaging. Why have we skipped over this green gem?


To give these sweet greens their due, we’ve added chef Rosalia Barron’s mâche salad to our fall repertoire. Barron tosses the starter, which also features crispy pork belly, in a wine-infused agrodolce dressing, a traditional... Read more >

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Recipe: Rodolfo Contreras's Pork Belly with Apple Cider Jus

Pork belly with Apple Cider JusThis playful pork-belly appetizer features some disguised garnishes; your guests will be pleasantly surprised when they take a bite.

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Recipe: Bourbon and Peppercorn–Glazed Pork Belly

In case Memorial Day grillables weren't enough to sate your inner carnivore, this recipe for glazed pork belly should do the trick. It's slathered in brown sugar, soy, and bourbon, a sticky-and-sweet mix that hardens into an irresistibly crispy coating after roasting in the oven.

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Eat this Word: Sous-Vide

SOUS-VIDE WHAT? Haute boil-in-bag cooking. Conceptually the opposite of pressure cooking, sous-vide is a technique whereby foods are vacuum sealed in plastic bags and cooked in a temperature-controlled water bath. It was developed by Georges Pralus in 1974, while he was working at Troisgros. Sous-vide spread throughout the Michelin three-star set, but it didn't make a large impact in the United States until now, when it seems to be filling a vacuum. Because most sous-vide dishes are prepared individually, it aids in portion control and increases efficiency on the hot line. Cooking in a sealed environment also minimizes product shrinkage. And rather than evaporating into the air, the juices and flavors remain trapped inside the bag. The sous-vide technique also proves helpful as chefs increasingly travel to cook guest dinners; they can literally just boil in the bag, slit it open, and serve. WHERE?

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