Recipe: Mâche Salad with Pork Belly Lardons, Crispy Capers, Pine Nuts, and Plum Agrodolce Dressing

Mâche Salad

 

In the American salad bowl, mâche, known also as lamb's lettuce, is often left out of the mix. A variety of longstanding popularity in France, it has a tender, velvety texture and sweet, nutty flavor. Mâche lends itself easily to the autumn salad, without coercing or massaging. Why have we skipped over this green gem?

 

To give these sweet greens their due, we’ve added chef Rosalia Barron’s mâche salad to our fall repertoire. Barron tosses the starter, which also features crispy pork belly, in a wine-infused agrodolce dressing, a traditional... Read more >

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Recipe: Rodolfo Contreras's Pork Belly with Apple Cider Jus

Pork belly with Apple Cider JusThis playful pork-belly appetizer features some disguised garnishes; your guests will be pleasantly surprised when they take a bite.

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Recipe: Bourbon and Peppercorn–Glazed Pork Belly

In case Memorial Day grillables weren't enough to sate your inner carnivore, this recipe for glazed pork belly should do the trick. It's slathered in brown sugar, soy, and bourbon, a sticky-and-sweet mix that hardens into an irresistibly crispy coating after roasting in the oven.

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Eat this Word: Sous-Vide

SOUS-VIDE WHAT? Haute boil-in-bag cooking. Conceptually the opposite of pressure cooking, sous-vide is a technique whereby foods are vacuum sealed in plastic bags and cooked in a temperature-controlled water bath. It was developed by Georges Pralus in 1974, while he was working at Troisgros. Sous-vide spread throughout the Michelin three-star set, but it didn't make a large impact in the United States until now, when it seems to be filling a vacuum. Because most sous-vide dishes are prepared individually, it aids in portion control and increases efficiency on the hot line. Cooking in a sealed environment also minimizes product shrinkage. And rather than evaporating into the air, the juices and flavors remain trapped inside the bag. The sous-vide technique also proves helpful as chefs increasingly travel to cook guest dinners; they can literally just boil in the bag, slit it open, and serve. WHERE?

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