Eat this Word: Scrapple

scrappleWHAT? Rehashed hog hodgepodge. Though a packed loaf of pig scraps and offal may not entice those with squeamish stomachs, scrapple has been enjoyed in the Pennsylvania Dutch region since its first settlers set up shop there. (According to the Habbersett company—which has been slinging scrapple since 1863—the product was invented in Chester County, PA, home to the state’s oldest colony.) Similar to black pudding or German panhas, scrapple was an invention born of frugality, a delicious way to use up every last piece of the pig after slaughtering. To the leftover porky parts New World pioneers added buckwheat and cornmeal—two crops indigenous to the area—and seasonings before setting in loaf-shaped molds. Sliced and fried until golden brown, scrapple has a crispy texture and well-spiced flavor similar to that of a country sausage patty. You can still find it in

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On the Menu: Bobby Hellen Cooks a Dream Feast for Meatavores

Bobby Hellen We're doing things a little differently at the Beard House tonight: revered meat "prodigy" and Resto chef Bobby Hellen is roasting an entire pig and lamb for a nose-to-tail, family-style meal of meat mania (we won't tell your doctor if you don't tell ours). Check out the evening's goods: Boudin Noir Tart with Cheddar–Apple Purée Crumble; and Lamb Heart Confit with Celeriac and Chestnuts Pig’s Leg Salad with Chicory, Pig’s Ears, and Warm Guanciale Vin Lamb Neck Salad with Banyuls and Caramelized Yogurt Porchetta with Fennel Pollen, Rosemary, Thyme, and Pig Liver Lamb Roulade with Lemon Zest and Parsley Pork Ribs with Salt and Pepper Lamb Ribs with Belgian Carbonnade Sauce and Pickled Carrots Charcuterie Plate > Boudin Blanc, Lamb–Pepper Sausage, Pork–Garlic Sausage, Andouille Sausage, Pork Liver Pâté, and Head Cheese, Served with Whole-Grain Mustard, Apples, and Frisée From the

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Reel Food: JBF Award Winner Charlie Palmer on the Early Show

Right on the heels of Alfred Portale, chef and restaurateur extraordinaire Charlie Palmer stopped by the CBS studios this morning to offer his tips on cooking pork. The segment made us all the more hungry for the Niman Ranch pork loin that he's preparing at tonight's American Icons gala auction and dinner. Watch the video below (after a short commercial):

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Eye Candy: Beard House

Bloomfield April Bloomfield and her team plate a pork trio of head cheese, terrine, and rillettes during her Beard House dinner last Monday. View more images of the pig-packed event here. (Photo by Eileen Miller)

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On the Menu: April Bloomfield, Pork, and Malt

April Bloomfield When the Michelin Guide revealed its latest list of starred restaurants earlier this month, we saw that the Spotted Pig garnered a star for the fifth year in a row. The dedicated April Bloomfield undoubtedly has her fingerprints all over  the gastro-pub's ongoing success, and we'll be jockeying for seats at the Breslin when it starts serving lunch this week. We're also beyond excited that she's swinging by the Beard House next week to prepare an all-out pig-out. Here's a look at the menu: Hors d’Oeuvre Radishes with Pesto Jerusalem Artichoke Soup Cheese Beignets Sea Bream with Pomegranate Dinner For the table > Potato

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Reel Food: Will Gilson Breaks It Down—Pig, That Is.

Last week Cambridge chef Will Gilson served us a "farmers' market–fed pig tasting" using two pigs he raised specifically for his Beard House dinner (he also went deep-sea fishing to collect lobster off the Massachusetts shore for his corn and lobster succotash—that's a dedicated locavore!). In the video below, Gilson gives a tour of the dish.

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Eat this Word: Rillettes [ree-YEHT]

RillettesWHAT? Coveted crock. "I certainly had never had the happiness of seeing that brown mess spread on slices of bread and butter," recalled Honoré de Balzac of watching his schoolmates eat the savory spread he so desired. A native of Tours, the French literary legend may have belonged to one of the few families that couldn't afford the humble specialty of the region, where the fatty favorite is lovingly referred to as "brown jam." As with other pâtés and terrines, rillettes begin with chopped meat, salted and cooked slowly in fat (the recipe dates back to the 15th century Loire Valley, where it was likely created to use up leftover scraps of pork). The tender morsels are then shredded and stored in ramekins or crocks covered with additional fat. This age-old technique results in a rustic yet deliciously creamy paste that has aromas of garlic, bay leaf, thyme, and wine. Literally translated, rillettes means "plank," which probably refers to its appearance when

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On the Menu: Porkapalooza

Tomorrow night we're bringing pigging out to a whole new level. For a special Greens event—part of our ongoing programming for foodies under 40—Sara Jenkins, Anita Lo, Nick Morgenstern, and Ryan Skeen are preparing a dinner that will feature pork in every course. The menu includes such porcine morsels like tête de cochon sandwiches, a baby pig tasting, and apple pie with a pork lard crust—and there will be plenty of premium beer and wine pairings to wash it all down. See the complete Porkapalooza menu here.

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