Recipe: James Beard's Steak Pizzaiola

SteakThis saucy, savory steak is sure to impress your friends at your next weekend barbecue. In James Beard's Treasury of Outdoor Cooking, Beard suggests serving this grilled steak (which is then quickly simmered in a garlicky tomato sauce) with a side of buttered noodles (to soak up the sauce), a mixed salad with garlic croutons, and a bottle of Valpolicella.

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Recipe: James Beard's Steak Pizzaiola

SteakThis saucy, savory steak is sure to impress your friends at your next weekend barbecue. In James Beard's Treasury of Outdoor Cooking, Beard suggests serving this grilled steak (which is then quickly simmered in a garlicky tomato sauce) with a side of buttered noodles (to soak up the sauce), a mixed salad with garlic croutons, and a bottle of Valpolicella.

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Recipe: Chicken with 40 Cloves of Garlic

images1A true James Beard classic, this simple recipe may seem like it contains an overwhelming amount of garlic, but it actually highlights the allium’s softer side. The slow cooking time mellows the strong garlic taste and aroma and creates a buttery-mild garlic-perfumed paste that’s perfect spread on crusty bread. Get recipe >

 

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Recipe: Strawberry Crêpes

strawberries_blog2

The markets are just starting to brim with sweet, juicy strawberries. Alexandra Guarnaschelli of NYC's Butter gave us this recipe for delicious strawberry crêpes with chocolate sauce last summer when she was a featured JBF chef on ABC News Now's A Chefs Table series.

Get a taste of Alex's savory side later this month at our Cocktails and Canapés event at the Beard House, also featuring NYC chefs Akhtar Nawab, Jason Neroni, Doug Psaltis, and mixologist Junior Merino.

Watch a demo of... Read more >

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Recipe: Roasted Colorado Rack of Lamb with Spring Pea Sauté and Pea Emulsion

Kelly Liken's lamb

The various greens of spring—peas, mint, and fava beans—are now coloring every corner of farmers' markets nationwide; this recipe for roasted Colorado rack of lamb unifies them in a bright, elegant emulsion. It comes from Kelly Liken of Restaurant Liken in Vail, CO.

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Recipe: James Beard's Huckleberry Cake

HuckleberriesAn Oregon native, James Beard was fond of the many types of wild berries that dot the Pacific Northwestern landscape. In Delights and Prejudices he recounts the springtime berry-picking excursions he took as a child with his family, searching for fruits to use in baked goods and jams. The holy grail of these outings was the huckleberry, which typically grows on mountain slopes and is difficult to reach. When the Beards had the good fortune to stumble upon an elusive patch, they gathered huckleberries to put in pies, clafoutis, or this simple but fantastic cake, a recipe from a family friend. Huckleberry cultivation is rare, so you usually won't see them at grocery stores or farmers' markets. Blueberries, which are similar in flavor and will be available soon, are an excellent substitute.

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Recipe: James Beard's Huckleberry Cake

HuckleberriesAn Oregon native, James Beard was fond of the many types of wild berries that dot the Pacific Northwestern landscape. In Delights and Prejudices he recounts the springtime berry-picking excursions he took as a child with his family, searching for fruits to use in baked goods and jams. The holy grail of these outings was the huckleberry, which typically grows on mountain slopes and is difficult to reach. When the Beards had the good fortune to stumble upon an elusive patch, they gathered huckleberries to put in pies, clafoutis, or this simple but fantastic cake, a recipe from a family friend. Huckleberry cultivation is rare, so you usually won't see them at grocery stores or farmers' markets. Blueberries, which are similar in flavor and will be available soon, are an excellent substitute.

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Recipe: Juanita Dean’s Southern Fried Chicken

Fried Chicken
It may only be Wednesday, but we're already thinking about what to pack for our Memorial Day picnic. Sure burgers and dogs are great, but nothing is quite the same as a great piece of crispy fried chicken. Perfect hot or cold, this Southern fried chicken is a guaranteed crowd pleaser—no buns or condiments required. This version of the classic comes to us from JBF Associate member Dr. Nathan Goldstein. While growing up in Birmingham, Alabama, Juanita Dean’s fried chicken was one of his family’s favorite snacks. Dean learned the “recipe” from her mother, who probably learned it from her mother. Recipe is in quotation marks because, of course, nothing was ever measured.

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The Bookshelf: Beard on Books Recap

olives and orangesYesterday, at Beard on Books, Sara Jenkins discussed her cookbook Olives & Oranges: Recipes and Flavor Secrets from Italy, Spain, Cyprus & Beyond with guests at the Beard House. She joked that she is “really a home cook who got misplaced in a professional kitchen,” and in testing recipes for the book she happily rediscovered the joys of home cooking. Jenkins truly believes that simplicity rules: “The greatest thing you can do to food is not mess it up.” As the daughter of a foreign correspondent, Jenkins grew up throughout the Mediterranean. While in Italy, Lebanon, and Cyprus, she was exposed to a rural existence where electricity was a novelty and eating with friends and family was at the heart of life. Her memories are filled with good food and wonderful

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Recipe: Sinatra Smash

blackberriesOne of the highlights of the Beard Awards reception was the vast assortment of festive cocktails. Among our favorites was this delicious blackberry and whiskey concoction from Patricia Richards of the Wynn Las Vegas. Here’s the recipe: 4 fresh blackberries 1 ½ ounces fresh sweet and sour mix ¼ ounce Sonoma Vanilla–infused simple syrup ½ ounce Briotett crème de cassis 1 ½ ounces Gentleman Jack Tennessee Whiskey Muddle the blackberries with the sweet and sour. Add simple syrup, crème de cassis, and whiskey. Shake with ice until chilled, strain over cracked ice in an old-fashioned glass, and serve garnished with a mint sprig.

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