Recipe Roundup: Cooking for a Crowd

Joanne Bondy's farmer's macaroni and cheese

 

It's been two weeks since Hurricane Sandy touched down in New York and New Jersey, but many of the hardest hit communities are still reeling. For those of us who live nearby and want to help, providing food to those without power or running water is a great way to get involved. Most FEMA and community-organized relief sites will accept donations of homemade food, and hot meals are particularly appreciated. Here are a few of the recipes we turn to when cooking for a crowd:

 

Baked Orzo with Eggplant and Mozzarella [Smitten Kitchen]

Adapted from a recipe by vegetable maestro Yotam Ottolenghi, this hearty yet not-too-heavy baked pasta is perked up with a pinch of lemon zest and pillowy bites of fried eggplant. Canned tomatoes can be substituted for fresh when out of season.

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Recipe: Fried Chicken Biscuit Sandwiches with Wildflower Honey and Chile Flakes

Fried Chicken Biscuit Sandwiches with Wildflower Honey and Chile Flakes

Crunchy fried chicken hugged in a flaky biscuit—is there anything better? We dare you say otherwise after trying these satisfying biscuit sandwiches from Abraham Salum of Dallas's Komali and Salum. Instead of smothering the chicken with gravy, Salum glosses it with a chile flake–speckled honey. Get the recipe here.

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Eat this Word: Monte Cristo

Monte Cristo

WHAT? The count’s revenge? The origins of this rich sandwich of ham, chicken or turkey, and Swiss cheese that is either dipped in egg and fried in butter or made with already dipped and fried French toast are not clear. A staple of diners across the country, where it is sometimes served with jelly or maple syrup for dipping, the sandwich is thought to be related to the club sandwich, or maybe the Reuben (Jewish delicatessens sometimes substitute corned beef and sauerkraut for the traditional fillings). Lieut.-Col. Newnham-Davis, author of The Gourmet Guide to Europe (1903), suggests a Spanish ancestor, a sandwich from Seville for which "a slice of ham is put between two slices of bread and dipped in sherry, [then] in egg and fried." In truth the sandwich was probably the fruit of a creative line-cook’s imagination, or maybe just an accident. One thing that mystifies is the name. There is nothing in Dumas’s masterpiece to suggest why a

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