Eye Candy: Montauk Yellowfin Tuna with Tangelo–White Soy Purée, Tempura Cilantro, and Sea Beans

Photo by Jeff Gurwin

 

Charming waterfront hot spot Dave’s Grill has some of Montauk’s toughest seats to snag during the summer, but Beard House guests were in for a treat when this seasonal showstopper relocated to West 12th Street for a winter seafood feast. Chef Michael Bingham presented a sensational surfeit of surf and turf, delighting diners with dynamite dishes like Crispy Pork Belly with Thai Curry, Cilantro, and Charred Scallion Oil (get the recipe here); Slow-Scrambled Long Island Duck Eggs with Duck Sausage and Kimchi Rice; and Golden Tilefish with Cauliflower Purée, Chimichurri, Roasted Oyster Mushrooms, and Bay Leaf Oil. But one of the most memorable dishes was this arresting plate which opened the night’s tasting menu. Bingham lived up to his... Read more >

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Eat This Word: Sea Beans

 

WHAT?  Nautical haricots verts. Popeye may have had spinach, but a seafaring vegetarian's delight is the sea bean. The American sea bean is a type of samphire [SAM-fy-uhr] known as salicornia. Its other aliases are glasswort (it was used to make glass at one time), marsh samphire, and sea pickle. Sea beans proliferate on both the Pacific and Atlantic coasts. Some have spiky green leaves that make the plant look like a skinny miniature cactus without the needles. Others look surprisingly similar to Chinese long beans. The crisp leaves and stems smell and taste like sea salt. Fresh sea beans can be found from the summer through the fall, and are best when used fresh or pickled. When cooked, sea beans have a tendency to taste salty and even fishy.

 

WHERE? New England Thanksgiving

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Eat this Word: Sea Beans

Sea Beans WHAT? Nautical haricots verts. Popeye may have had spinach, but a seafaring vegetarian's delight is the sea bean. The American sea bean is a type of samphire [SAM-fy-uhr] known as salicornia. Its other aliases are glasswort (it was used to make glass at one time), marsh samphire, and sea pickle. Sea beans proliferate on both the Pacific and Atlantic coasts. Some have spiky green leaves that make the plant look like a skinny miniature cactus without the needles. Others look surprisingly similar to Chinese long beans. The crisp leaves and stems smell and taste like sea salt. Fresh sea beans can be found from the summer through the fall, and are best when used fresh or pickled. When cooked, sea beans have a tendency to taste salty and even fishy. WHERE? Dominic Zumpano's Beard House dinner WHEN?

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