On the Menu: May 30 through June 5

Here’s what’s happening at the Beard House next week: Wednesday, June 2, 7:00 P.M. Along the Aegean What’s a rigorously French-trained chef and alum of Jean Georges, Le Bernardin, and French Laundry doing cooking Greek food in Atlanta? Some might say he’s fulfilling his destiny. The son of legendary restaurateur I. Pano Karatassos, the younger chef Karatassos has shaped Kyma into a nationally renowned Greek seafood mecca. Thursday, June 3, 6:00 P.M. Beard on Film Lights, camera, eat! Our annual preview party of the NYC Food Film Festival is back, featuring a walk-around feast, a trailer screening, and a discussion with some of the directors of this year’s

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On the Menu: April 25 through May 1

Here’s what’s happening at the Beard House next week: Monday, April 26, 7:00 P.M. Sustainable Seafood Feast At the intimate Copper Beech Inn, acclaimed executive chef Tyler Anderson finds inspiration in the Connecticut River Valley, creating New England–inflected modern American dishes. An alum of Vermont’s Equinox and Colorado’s RockResorts, Anderson has designed a magnificent menu for this feast, pairing pristine local produce with the finest sustainable seafood. Tuesday, April 27, 7:00 P.M. Le Cirque Spectacular Though the recent multimillion-dollar reopening of Le Cirque marked a new era in the storied restaurant’s 30-

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Eat this Word: Stone Crabs

WHAT? Seafood for the softhearted. As only the sweet, white claw meat of this warm water crustacean is eaten, fishermen twist the claws off and throw the crab back in the sea. The claws regenerate after about 18 months, although the new claw--known as a retread--is smaller than the original. Fisherman typically leave each crab with one claw so it can defend itself. James Peterson wrote in Fish & Shellfish that he was "shocked" the first time he saw the claws for sale because he assumed, mistakenly, that the crustacean had been killed for a relatively small amount of meat. The crabs, considered a delicacy today, were popularized 80 years ago at Joe's Stone Crab Restaurant in Miami Beach, now a historical landmark. You eat them, usually cold, by cracking the shell with a mallet and dipping the succulent meat in sauce. WHERE?

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