Giveaway: Get an Artisan Tea Sampler from Beard House Purveyor Mighty Leaf Tea!

Mighty Leaf Tea
As our schedules return to revved-up status after the easygoing weeks of summer, we’re called back to the pleasures of sipping on a mellow mug of tea after a long day. To help you maximize these relaxing moments, we’re teaming up with our fine tea purveyor, Mighty Leaf Tea, to give away 500 free samples of their amazing artisan teas!

Mighty Leaf recognizes that the purest, most natural ingredients deliver the richest tea flavors and unforgettable sensory experiences. Their artisan-crafted blends of whole leaf tea touch all the senses, blending together whole tea leaves, fruit, spices, and blossoms—flavors too big for ordinary tea bags. Mighty Leaf teas are always whole leaf teas, never cut, torn or crushed, and are wrapped in simple, artisan-crafted tea pouches, which are made from fully biodegradable materials.

The San Francisco–based company is giving away the following sampler to 500 members of the JBF community: 1 iced

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Recipe: Jasmine Tea Sorbet

Jasmine Tea Sorbet There's no better antidote to a humidity-cloaked day than this elegant and mellow sorbet from Ty Bellingham of New York's Kittichai. The icy treat gets its breezy, floral character from jasmine and Earl Grey tea leaves, while coconut milk adds a refreshing sweetness. Get the recipe here. Looking for more ways to cool down? We've got more frozen dessert recipes here.

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Recipes: Mother's Day Tea

Shuna Lydon's rose petal–vanilla bean shortbreadShuna Lydon's rose petal–vanilla bean shortbread

Instead of taking Mom out for the requisite brunch this Mother's Day, why not throw a tea party in her honor? Keep things simple with this selection of decadent homemade sweets. Rose Petal–Vanilla Bean Shortbread These rose petal–flecked cookies have a wonderful crumbly texture and a delicate sweet, floral flavor. Homemade Mallomars Make your own batch of these gooey, crunchy, chocolate-covered marshmallow

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On the Menu: Valentine's Tea

Valentine's Day candies Treat your valentine to a romantic afternoon tea prepared by an all-star group of New York chefs. (See the full lineup here.) The incredible talents collaborating on this feast will tempt diners with a decadent selection of delicate savories and tempting sweets. Check out the menu below, then click here to secure your spot. Sweets Plain and Chocolate–Sweet Herb Scones with Kumquat Marmalade Irish Tea Brack Petits Fours Glacés Lemon–Lavender Jewels Miniature Mallomars (Get the recipe!) Dark Chocolate–Dipped Cinnamon Meringues Pear–

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On the Menu: Valentine's Tea

Valentine's Day candies Treat your valentine to a romantic afternoon tea prepared by an all-star group of New York chefs. (See the full lineup here.) The incredible talents collaborating on this feast will tempt diners with a decadent selection of delicate savories and tempting sweets. Check out the menu below, then click here to secure your spot. Sweets Plain and Chocolate–Sweet Herb Scones with Kumquat Marmalade Irish Tea Brack Petits Fours Glacés Lemon–Lavender Jewels Miniature Mallomars (Get the recipe!) Dark Chocolate–Dipped Cinnamon Meringues Pear–

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Eat this Word: Amaranth

amaranthWHAT? A good Host. The Aztecs revered this mighty grain, using it in religious rituals to make what Barbara Grunes and Virginia Van Vynckt, authors of All-American Waves of Grain, liken to a Holy Communion wafer. The carnivorous sun-worshippers would combine the tiny grain with a liquid mixture that sometimes contained blood, form the concoction into cakes, and use the cakes in religious ceremonies. People who ate these cakes believed they were eating the flesh of the gods. Not surprisingly, the Spanish didn't approve of this custom, nor of the Aztecs generally. The conquistadors wiped out Aztec civilization and for good measure destroyed many acres of amaranth. For the next four centuries, the grain was practically unknown. Rediscovered a couple decades ago, it is now highly touted for its healthful properties. Amaranth greens, which taste similar to spinach, are edible, as are the seeds (which are sometimes ground to make flour). Many natural food stores

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