Recipe Roundup: Zucchini

 

To be honest, zucchini hasn't always been our favorite vegetable. It used to sit in our vegetable crisper, slowly getting spongy, while we worked our way through the other contents of our CSA box. But one day, this bright, flavorful salad totally turned us around on the summer squash. And now we can't get enough of it--we pickle zucchini and throw it into grain salads, soak strips of zucchini in garlicky olive oil and grill them until crisp and slightly charred, and freeze bags of grated zucchini to use in Jessica Seinfeld-approved quick breads all year long. If you're still wary, here are some recipes that just might make you a believer too:

 

Zucchini and Ricotta with Tomato and Olive Oil on Grilled Bread [JBF]

Grilled bread spread with creamy ricotta is the perfect foil for a... Read more >

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Recipe Roundup: Simple Summer Seafood

 

Summertime is all about the water—whether you're swimming in it or eating from it. We crave seafood this time of year, but we like to keep it simple with ceviches, seafood salads, and sandwiches that come together quickly so we can spend less time in the kitchen and more time on the beach.

 

Lobster Rolls

Is there anything better than sweet chunks of fresh, chilled lobster tossed with mayonnaise (Hellman's, of course) and served in a warm, buttered bun? With cooked lobster meat made ahead of time (or better yet, left over from a lobster boil the night before) this New England classic couldn't be easier to make.

 

Summer Crab and Tomato Salad

JBF Award winner Donald Link serves this light, flavorful salad with simply dressed watercress... Read more >

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Eat this Word: Purslane

PurslaneWHAT? In the weeds. The Forme of Cury, the earliest known English cookbook (published around 1390 by Richard II's cooks), asks for "purslarye" in a salad recipe; colonists brought the plant to America, where they used it as an herb and pickled it for a condiment; and a few sources say it was Ghandi's favorite vegetable. It's a main ingredient in fattoush, a Middle-Eastern bread salad, and Arabs once believed that if sprinkled around the bed, the small, oval-shaped leaves could chase away erotic dreams. (Why they'd want to, we don't know.) At some point in this country, purslane fell into disfavor. Waverly Root quotes a certain William Cobett on purslane in 1819: "a mischievous weed that Frenchmen and pigs eat when they can get nothing else." Happily, American chefs are rediscovering the herb's subtly tart pleasures. WHERE? Tom Crenshaw's Beard House Dinner

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