Awards Watch: Video!

In case you missed the festivities on Monday, you can watch the JBF Awards ceremony in its entirety here. The opening montage and clips about the Lifetime Achievement and Humanitarian of the Year Awards are below:

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America’s Classic: Noriega Restaurant and Hotel, Bakersfield, CA

Originally founded as a home away from home for shepherds, today the institution showcases the Basque culture of California’s San Joaquin Valley.

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America’s Classic: Crook’s Corner, Chapel Hill, NC

Since 1982, Crook’s Corner has carried the torch of regional foodways, employing and inspiring a generation of young culinary talent—including two James Beard Award–winning chefs.

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Humanitarian of the Year: FareStart

The 2011 Humanitarian of the Year Award goes to FareStart, a Seattle-based nonprofit organization that provides culinary job training and placement for homeless and disadvantaged individuals.

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America’s Classic: Watts Tea Shop, Milwaukee

Many of the dishes at Watts Tea Shop, this fifth-generation Milwaukee institution, follow recipes that have been used since the 1930s.

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America’s Classic: Le Veau d’Or, NYC



Once a celebrity haunt, this midtown Manhattan French bistro serving classic French dishes straight out of Escoffier, is a time capsule.

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America’s Classic: Chef Vola’s, Atlantic City, NJ

Customers make pilgrimages to eat at Chef Vola’s, a traditional Italian-American eatery in Atlantic City, and our first America’s Classic of the night.

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2011 JBF Awards Show Opener

  The 2011 Awards opening video, for those of you not watching our live stream at jamesbeard.org/awardslive.

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The Bookshelf: Harvest to Heat

Harvest to HeatWith more and more chefs taking up the mantle of the locavore movement, we rarely find ourselves sitting down to a menu that doesn’t recognize the sources of its ingredients. These small-print acknowledgements often leave us wondering about the individuals who are responsible for getting those products from farm to table. Thankfully, a new cookbook called Harvest to Heat puts artisans and farmers front and center. Its recipes are not only attributed to the chefs who cook them, but also to the small-scale craftsmen who grow, raise, or craft the essential ingredients; every dish illustrates a mutual respect and collaboration between producer and chef. Authors Darryl Estrine and Kelly Kochendorfer have also included captivating profiles on these behind-the-scenes craftsmen, many of whom work tirelessly to advance local- and national-scale causes when they aren’t doting on their products. Dave Hoyle of Creative Growers in Nori, Oregon, has introduced Naomi

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