Happy Hour: Negroni Bianco

negroni bianco

 

Gabe and Katherine Thompson’s intimate restaurants offer discerning New York City diners soulful Italian cuisine with a modern spin. For this week's Happy Hour column, we tapped their talented partner and beverage director, Joe Campanale, for one of his delectable cocktail recipes. Behold, the negroni bianco. "The negroni is my favorite cocktail, and I like to have a version of it at each restaurant," explains Campanale. "As we were opening L'Apicio, I was tasting Cocchi Americano (a great Italian aperitivo that's clear in color) and it gave me the idea to create a white negroni." The traditional negroni is equal parts gin, red vermouth, and Campari with an orange twist—Campanale riffed on the cult cl... Read more >

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On the Menu: Week of March 9

 

Monday, March 9, 7:00 P.M.
Berkshires' First Taste of Spring 
Known as much for its rich culinary culture as for its glorious highlands, the Berkshires boasts some of the country’s best farm-to-table restaurants, including Bo Peabody's and Nancy Thomas’s Allium and Mezze. Join us as we toast to spring over a stunning early-season menu that will showcase the area’s top toques.

 

Tuesday, March 10, 7:00 P.M.
New York Icon, Reinvented 
After three decades at his trailblazing Chanterelle, JBF Award winner David Waltuck has embarked on a new chapter at the critically acclaimed élan. Come see what this iconic New York chef has been up to when he brings a menu of modern, whimsical fare to the Beard House.

 

Wednesday, March 11, 7:00 P.M.
... Read more >

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Sustainability Matters: March 6, 2015

 

A new study from the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity reveals that recent changes to government-subsidized school meals are getting kids to eat more fruit. [NYT

 

The newest method for measuring obesity in the U.S. could be the genetic analysis of sewage. [The Atlantic

 

As more cities move towards composting programs, produce stickers have emerged as a potential stumbling block. [NYT

 

Australian dairy company A2 Milk, whi... Read more >

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Throwback Thursday: Sunday Supper at Chelsea Market

Photo by: Tom Kirkman

 

With the seventh annual Sunday Supper at Chelsea Market mere weeks away, we couldn’t resist reminiscing about the delicious feasts of years past. These family-style benefit dinners at Manhattan's Chelsea Market are prepared by a team of prestigious and innovative chefs from NYC and across the country. This TBT, we're throwing it back to our 2013 Sunday Supper, where the market's main hall was lavishly decorated for more than 300 guests. JBF Award winners Sarabeth Levine, Barbara Lynch, and Jacques Torres were just a handful of the esteemed chefs turning out stunning plates such as goat belly with kimchi and rich chocolate bonbons.

 

Bring your appetites on March 22, 2015, for this year's Sunday Supper, and help raise funds for culinary education initiatives through JBF and the Jamestown Charitable Foundation. It’s sure to be far more fun than your average day at the market.... Read more >

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Alton Brown and Carla Hall to Host 2015 Awards

Alton Brown will host the James Beard Awards in Chicago

 

The 2015 James Beard Awards, an event that already guarantees plenty of culinary star power, just got more exciting. We're thrilled to announce that Food Network personality Alton Brown will host this spring's James Beard Awards ceremony in Chicago, taking place at Lyric Opera of Chicago on Monday, May 4. The former star of the Peabody Award–winning Good Eats, Brown has lent his talents to a number of other Food Network shows, including Iron Chef America, Feasting on Asphalt, Feasting on Waves, The Next Iron Chef, The Next Food Network Star, and Cutthroat Kitchen.

 

 

 

Carla Hall will host the James Beard Foundation's 2015 Book, Broadcast, and Journalism Awards Dinner

 

Carla Hall, host of ABC's The Chew... Read more >

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Ask a Chef: Make or Buy Bread?

While it may seem that the scale has tipped toward housemade everything, even top toques will admit that the best option sometimes lies outside the restaurant kitchen. We asked chefs from around the country to spill about what they source in and out of house. They share their thoughts on bread in our final installment.

 

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JBF Award Winner John Besh, Besh Restaurant Group, New Orleans: 

“I always said I would not make bread in my restaurants until I could make it as well as the bakers down the street. Now I have chefs that are able to do that, and I'm even opening a bakery, Willa Jean, with Kelly Fields and Lisa White.”

 

 

JBF Award Winner Ashley Christensen, Beasley’s Chicken + Honey, Chuck’s, Fox Liquor Bar, and Poole’s Downtown Diner, Raleigh, North Carolina:

“Bread is currently a split for us. We supplement house-baked breads with Tribeca Oven par-baked baguettes. We have a very talented pastry chef,... Read more >

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What We're Reading: March 5, 2015

 

Let it rain sprinkles: find out the secrets to baking the ultimate birthday cake. [Bon Appétit

 

Why are overfished sharks still being served? [NPR

 

Restaurants across the country are making it unfashionable to waste food. [NYT

 

Fully Baked: Ben & Jerry's hopes to one day sell pot-infused ice cream. [FWF

 

Bartenders are adding vinegar to your cocktails, and it's no accident. [... Read more >

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Eat This Word: Bagna Cauda

 

WHAT? A hot soak for your veggies. Bagna cauda, Italian for hot bath, is a very old dish with a Piedmont pedigree. Once considered a poor man's meal, bagna cauda has become one of the region's most popular foods. The "bath" is a tangy sauce made from garlic, olive oil, and anchovy; butter is often added in as well. To keep the sauce hot, it's typically served over a flame. Raw, or sometimes lightly cooked vegetables, cut into bite-size pieces, are dipped into it using a long-pronged fork. In Piedmont, fennel, cauliflower, cabbage, and red peppers are the veggies of choice, but any vegetable that's good to eat raw works well with bagna cauda, too.

 

WHERE? Berkshires' First Taste of Spring

 

WHEN? March 9, 2015

 

HOW? Whippe... Read more >

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Ask a Chef: Make or Buy Charcuterie?

While it may seem that the scale has tipped toward housemade ​everything, even top toques will admit that the best option sometimes lies outside the restaurant kitchen. We asked chefs from around the country to spill about what they source in and out of house. Today we hear their stances on charcuterie.

 

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JBF Award Winner John Besh, Besh Restaurant Group: 

“We started raising hogs, and even went to the extent of buying a slaughterhouse, so that we would have access to the best pork to use for the sausage we make in our restaurants. “

 

 

JBF Award Winner Ashley Christensen, Beasley’s Chicken + Honey, Chuck’s, Fox Liquor Bar, and Poole’s Downtown Diner, Raleigh, North Carolina:

“We make all of our fresh sausages in-house. It’s a really neat means of harnessing specific flavors and bringing out unique characteristics in the various meats by way of ingredients, grinds, textures, and fat content. And,... Read more >

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What We're Reading: March 04, 2015

 

French vintners are torn over the topic of pesticide use. [NYT

 

Beyond roasting: chefs offer alternative takes on winter squash. [Serious Eats

 

Save yourself the stomach trouble by keeping an eye out for these most common sources of food poising. [The Atlantic

 

Have you heard of Baijiu? It’s the world’s most consumed liquor, and it’s finally making its way to the U.S. [Eater

 

Impress your Anglophilic friends with this recipe for classic British tea cakes. [... Read more >

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