Throwback Thursday: Remembering James Beard

 

 

August is coming to an end, and the first day of school is right around the corner, but we still have one last outdoor holiday to look forward to. Labor Day usually means one final hurrah with the family: backyard barbecues, picnics, beach trips, and grilling—lots of grilling. This Throwback Thursday we’re sharing some of our favorite James Beard quotes that demonstrate our namesake’s love for summer foods, the great outdoors, and the art of entertaining in any environment. 


“I love a casual picnic just as much as, or even more than, an elaborate gastronomic delight.” (Beard on Food, p.264)

 

“Arrangement is one of the secrets of a perfect composed salad. There should be a blend of colors, tastes, and textures. The ingredients should be attractively cut and the salad beautifully arranged on a large platter or in a bowl so that it becomes almost a centerpiece for the table.” (Beard on Bread, p.332)

 

“In recent years all America h... Read more >

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What We're Reading: August 20, 2015

 

Sweet, creamy, and tropical: devour this winning coconut cream pie recipe at home. [Food 52]

 

Politics aside, Myanmar offers a wide range of native delicacies. [NYT]

 

Vikings bravely paved culinary roads before us, one glass of bjorr at a time. [MUNCHIES]

 

Fast and cheap: brew your own lip-puckering sour beer at home. [Serious Eats]

 

Say hello to oocha: the mellower younger sister of matcha. [... Read more >

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Stems and Shells: Cooking with the Whole Vegetable

 

With "nose-to-tail" flying around the culinary scene like a swarm of bees, it was only a matter of time until the ethos of full, purposeful utilization made its way into the world of vegetable scraps. In this series, Tasting Table talks to food experts who are treating former cast-offs like broccoli stems, potato peels, or cabbage cores as ingredients to be cherished.

 

Aki Kamozawa and Alex Talbot are the married brains behind Ideas in Food, a combination blog, workshop, consulting firm, and all-around culinary brain trust that serves as a point of inspiration for many professional chefs. Their approach involves taking a second look as a starting point and seeing what others take for granted as an opportunity to explore new avenues in the kitchen. Can we do it better? Can we create b... Read more >

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Test Your Eat-Q: Food Waste

Reduce, reuse, and recycle your conservation knowledge with this food waste quiz!

 

 

 

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We're focusing on solutions to fight food waste all month long! Get the full coverage here​​

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What We're Reading: August 19, 2015

 

Momma’s boys (and girls): the love-hate relationship between bakers and their starters. [Serious Eats

 

Behind the scenes at Blue Hill at Stone Barns, where JBF Award winner Dan Barber has made eradicating food waste his delicious mission. [The Takeaway

 

Agent orange powder: you have the U.S. military to thank for all those bags of Cheetos. [Wired

 

New science suggests we shouldn’t fixate on cutting down on fat, carbs, or any other single macronutrient. [... Read more >

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Eat This Word: ‘Nduja

 

WHAT? Nestled at the “toe of the boot,” Calabria, Italy, is surrounded by crystal clear water and blanketed with rocky coasts, sandy beaches, and copious amounts of local agriculture. While Calabria has long been notorious for the ‘Ndrangheta mafia, it’s also the birthplace of ‘nduja: a spicy, spreadable salami, made with ground pork and red Calabrian chile peppers. Originating from a tiny village named Spilinga, the pigs destined for 'nduja are raised in a summery climate, and fed a diet of mostly acorns, grains, chestnuts, beets, and pumpkins. The time-honored process of making ‘nduja, one of the region's most cherished foods, begins with mixing the hand-ground pork trimmings together with salt and the chile peppers, and then kneading the combination into a smooth paste. The pork is then stuffed into a natural casing, briefly smoked, and then aged for months.  
 

‘Nduja tends to be on the spicy side, so combine it with a spoonful of ricotta cheese for a milder bite. This spreadab... Read more >

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The Bookshelf: Dan Barber's "The Third Plate"

 

This past spring JBF Award winner Dan Barber took the nose-to-tail and root-to-stalk philosophy a step further by transforming his acclaimed Blue Hill restaurant into the high-profile pop-up, wastED. The monthlong project tackled the food waste problem head-on, featuring dishes like monkfish wings and kale-rib stew. Barber credits his inspiration for the concept to the research he did for The Third Plate, which details his vision for the future of food, and won the medallion for Writing and Literature at our JBF Book, Broadcast, and Journalism Awards this year. Below, Barber digs into how our cultural history shapes our view of food, why wastED was so successful, and what chefs are doing to combat waste in the kitchen and on the table. 

 

JBF: In The Third Plate, you characterize America’s cultural conception of food as being based on everlasting abundance... Read more >

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What We're Reading: August 18, 2015

 

A California sushi chef is not only pushing boundaries through her menu, but also through her all-female staff. [MUNCHIES]

 

Shave off that milk mustache and try these dairy-free calcium sources. [Food Network

 

The rise and fall of food tech darling Good Eggs. [Food + Tech Connect

 

How did rosé go from guilty pleasure to luxury status symbol? [Vanity Fair

 

Heritage breeds, seeds, and menus: a new trend has chefs reaching back to colonial times for inspiration. [... Read more >

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The Southern Food New York Needs, According to Chef Matthew Bell

 

Southern-inspired fare is all the rage in New York City these days, but Matthew Bell, the chef at South on Main in Little Rock, Arkansas, will bring his interpretation to a special dinner at the James Beard House tonightWe caught up with the chef to learn where he eats on every visit to the big Apple, who he wants to grab dinner with while he's in town, and what Southern food he thinks NYC needs.

 

What is your favorite place to eat in New York, and what do you order there?
Matthew Bell: I only get to New York every so often from Little Rock so I always like to try new places—or classics I have never been to. The one place that seems to get me every time I am in town is... Read more >

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Eye Candy: ​Lemon Balm Tarts with Raspberries and Rosé Jelly at Chefs & Champagne

Photo: David Chow

 

At last month's 25th anniversary of Chefs & Champagne®, our annual summer tasting party in the Hamptons, we honored television personality, chef, and cookbook author Carla Hall​ with flowing Champagne Taittinger, the wines of Wölffer Estate Vineyard, and delectable culinary offerings from a select group of over 40 celebrated chefs. During our much-anticipated fête, chef Colleen Grapes of New York City's Oceana served perhaps one of the daintiest desserts of the evening: subtly sweet lemon balm tarts with raspberries and a gorgeous rosé jelly, all sitting atop a crispy shortbread base. The bright lemon cream was given a burst of flavor from the ripe summer raspberries and couldn't look any prettier with a final flourish of garden flowers. Th... Read more >

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