Recipe: Corn Sformato with Pancetta, Tomato, English Peas, and Fontina

Corn Sformato with Pancetta, Tomato, English Peas, and FontinaAs we learned earlier this week, the definition of sformato is hard to pin down (though we do know that it’s traditionally bound by eggs and molded). But there’s nothing perplexing about this decidedly summery version from chef Scott Fratangelo, featuring the classic seasonal trinity of corn, tomato, and basil.

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Sformato

Corn Sformato with Pancetta, Tomato, English Peas, and FontinaWHAT? Cooking out of the box. Sformato is ubiquitous on restaurant menus throughout Italy, yet its definition is elusive. The consonant-clustered name comes from the Italian verb sformare, meaning, “to unmold.” Predictably, the dish is cooked in a mold, or forma, and turned out onto a plate to serve. Sformati (that’s plural) can qualify as just about anything from vegetable side dishes to meaty main courses or even desserts. With a texture that can best be described as somewhere between a soufflé and flan, sformati almost always include eggs, but additional ingredients are up to the cook. Popular savory flavors include spinach, peas, or potatoes, but sweet renditions made with zabaglione, fruit, or chocolate are not uncommon. WHERE? Scott Fratangelo and Pastry Chef Jen Eunji Kim's Beard House Di

Comments (0)

In Memoriam: Michael Batterberry

Michael and Ariane Batterberry Along with the rest of the food world, we were saddened to learn of the death of food writer, historian, and publishing icon Michael Batterberry on July 28. Just a few months ago, the James Beard Foundation awarded the 2010 JBF Lifetime Achievement Award, which is given to an individual or individuals whose lifetime body of work has had a positive and long-lasting impact on the way we eat, cook, and think about food in America. Click here to read the essay about the Batterberrys ran in our 2010 Awards Program.

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Purslane

PurslaneWHAT? In the weeds. The Forme of Cury, the earliest known English cookbook (published around 1390 by Richard II's cooks), asks for "purslarye" in a salad recipe; colonists brought the plant to America, where they used it as an herb and pickled it for a condiment; and a few sources say it was Ghandi's favorite vegetable. It's a main ingredient in fattoush, a Middle-Eastern bread salad, and Arabs once believed that if sprinkled around the bed, the small, oval-shaped leaves could chase away erotic dreams. (Why they'd want to, we don't know.) At some point in this country, purslane fell into disfavor. Waverly Root quotes a certain William Cobett on purslane in 1819: "a mischievous weed that Frenchmen and pigs eat when they can get nothing else." Happily, American chefs are rediscovering the herb's subtly tart pleasures. WHERE? Tom Crenshaw's Beard House Dinner

Comments (0)

Test Your Eat-Q: Barbecue

barbecue As summer’s final stretch approaches, we know we’ll be seeking out some seriously slow-and-low eats. And while we’re on the subject, do you know the answer to this barbecue question? Bones from this animal were found during an archaeological dig in the Czech Republic, uncovering “the world’s oldest barbecue”:
A. Brontosaurus B. Buffalo C. Woolly mammoth D. Hammerhead shark
We’ve got a whole slew of trivia, so click here to see if you really have a clue about ‘cue.

Comments (0)

Recipe: Tawa Baingan

Tawa BainganThis Indian recipe for roasted eggplant and spiced mashed potatoes comes from chef Vikram Sunderam of Rasika Restaurant. A tawa is a flat and sturdy pan used in Indian cooking, but you don’t need one to make this dish: the tawa's American cousin, the griddle, will work just fine. (Baingan simply means eggplant.)

Comments (0)

On the Menu: August 8 through August 14

Beard House Here’s what’s happening at the Beard House next week: Tuesday, August 10, 7:00 P.M. Best of D.C. It’s comforting to know that no matter what is happening in the House and the Senate, Washington, D.C.’s dynamic food scene remains as deliciously compelling as ever. Find out for yourself when this group of D.C. power chefs visits us at the Beard House. Wednesday, August 11, 7:00 P.M. Great Friends, Great Chefs For years this powerhouse group of Beard House alums has collaborated on Taste of the NFL, an event that raises money to fight hunger and whose founder, Wayne Kostroski, won JBF’s 2010 Humanitarian of the Year award. Eager to reunite, they’ll be cooking together in our kitchen for the first time ever. Thursday, August 12, 7:00

Comments (0)

Pages