Awards Watch: Awards Theme and Hosts Announced

Beard medallion Italian maven Lidia Bastianich, fusion pioneer Wolfgang Puck, and kitchen science cognoscente Alton Brown will share the podium at this year's James Beard Foundation Awards, which will go down on Monday, May 3, at Lincoln Center. The theme of this year's ceremony is "The Legacy Continues," a nod to the lasting impact that James Beard and his successors have had on American cuisine. We're asking every chef who has won our Outstanding Chef award (Daniel Boulud, Thomas Keller, Grant Achatz, and others) to shine a spotlight on chefs whom they believe are extraordinary examples of excellence in our culinary world. The 2010 Awards Gala Reception will feature dishes from these established and emerging talents from around the country. (Some of our Outstanding Chef winners will be handing out this year's medals, so expect to see some of the big names in the house, too). We've also tapped Kelly Choi, host of Eat Out NY and Top Chef Master

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Eye Candy: A Photo with the Man Himself

Brian Cartenuto and staff Brian Cartenuto (center) and his staff from Cantinetta pose under James Beard's portrait after wrapping up their Italian dinner at the Beard House. Click here to see more photos from the evening.

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On the Menu: Modern American Grill

Carlo deMarco After apprenticing with renowned JBF Award winner Georges Perrier (Le Bec-Fin), Carlo deMarco set out on his own in the Main Line area of Philadelphia. After opening 333 Belrose and Firecreek Restaurant & Bar, he quickly attracted his own fans and accolades (including a coveted “Chef to Watch” designation from Esquire). We’ll get a taste of his contemporary American cuisine to the Beard House on Friday, March 5: Apple Trio > Apple Cider Bisque with Crisp Apple Chips; Green Apple, Bibb Lettuce, and Maytag Blue Cheese Salad with Candied Walnuts; and Chicken Livers with Spiced Apple Compote Pan-Seared Copper River Salmon with Warm Black Lentil Salad, Lobster–Tarragon Sauce, and Micro-Arugula Coffee and Macadamia–Crusted Pork Tenderloin with Slow-Roasted Yams and Mango, Lime, and Ginger Salsa Candied Bacon–Crusted Squab Breast with Anson Mills Grits, Molasses-Spiked Collard Greens, and Jus Apple

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Recipe: Cuban Braised Pork Shoulder

braised pork shoulderHugh Acheson's Cuban-inspired braised pork shoulder is the perfect dish for the last leg of winter. Spicy, comforting, and brightened with a trio of lemon, lime, and orange zests, it will help keep your spirits aloft through the thaw.

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Eye Candy: Port Royal Shrimp Rémoulade with Fried Green Tomato Salad and Benton’s Country Ham

shrimp rémoulade Mike Davis of Terra in West Columbia, South Carolina, served this classic New Orleans shrimp rémoulade at the Beard House last month; he made the dish extra special by adding fried green tomatoes and Benton's country ham. See more photos of his Southern menu here.

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On the Menu: February 28 through March 6

dining-room-by-erin-gleeson Here’s what happening at the Beard House next week: Monday, March 1, 7:00 P.M. Michelin Stars After taking over from Christopher Lee in late 2008, chef Justin Bogle earned Gilt two Michelin stars, cementing the extravagantly appointed restaurant’s place in the highest echelon of New York dining. Meet the culinary stars behind the Michelin stars, and taste the modern American cuisine that has garnered international acclaim. Wednesday, March 3, 7:00 P.M. Beaver Creek Luxe The majestic Rocky Mountains make a stunning backdrop for talented chef Pascal Coudouy’s bold, Colorado-inspired fare at 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill. Hailed as one of “15 restaurants not to miss” by John Mariani of Esquire

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Eat this Word: Gyoza

gyoza-by-matthew-mendozaWHAT? Japanese potstickers. Like many Japanese culinary traditions—chopsticks, noodles, and soy sauce, to name a few—gyoza, or pan-fried pork dumplings, were borrowed from the Chinese. Even the Japanese name is derived from the Mandarin jiaozi. A relative newcomer, it's believed gyoza arrived in Japan sometime in the 1930s, after the Japanese invasion of China, and were popularized around the country during the 1940s. Today, the Japanese dumplings have a more heavily seasoned filling and thinner dough than their Chinese cousins. Fried on one side until crisp then steamed until tender, gyoza are one of the few non-noodle dishes found on menus in ramen shops in Japan, where they are served with a dipping sauce of soy sauce, vinegar, and sesame or chili oil. There are also gyoza restaurants. True gyoza lovers should find their way to Ikebukuro's Sunshine City complex where part of the Namco Namjatown amusement cente

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