Sustainability Matters: December 5, 2014

 

Scientists agree that reducing—not eliminating—meat consumption is important to fighting climate change, but political action to do so remains unpopular. [Treehugger]

 

Doug Rauch, the former president of Trader Joe’s, plans on opening a store that sells past-date packaged goods and misshapen fruit and vegetables. While this may seem like the next big thing in sustainable shopping, it’s hardly a new concept. [Modern Farmer]

 

Ever wonder about the history of human-based carbon emissions? This interactive visualization from the World Resources Institute depicts the top 20 emitters over the past 150 years. [Grist]

 ... Read more >

Comments (0)

Throwback Thursday: The Beard House Latke Cookoff

 

The star is on the tree at Rockefeller Center, Salvation Army bells jingle on every corner, and the scent of pine needles permeates the streets of New York. But while everyone else is trimming their trees and decking their halls, the shorter days and yuletide decorations make us think of an old Beard House tradition—the Latke Cookoff. This annual event of amateurs and professionals ran from 1996 to 2001, and our own executive vice president Mitchell Davis won the inaugural potato playoffs. For this TBT, we’re featuring an artist’s rendering of Mitchell in his moment of victory, along with his winning recipe, which can also be found in his cookbook, The Mensch Chef. The secret to his spuds? His mother Sonny’s ratio of one onion for every two potatoes. And as everyone knows, you don’t argue with a Jewish mother. Check out the recipe here... Read more >

Comments (0)

Eat This Word: Pavolva

pavlova

 

WHAT? Named for the world-famous Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova, this fruit, whipped cream, and meringue dessert is claimed by rival nations. Aussies have long considered it their national dessert, but New Zealanders argue that they invented the pavlova, and they back up their claim with citations from cookbooks. The dancer toured both countries in the late 1920s. In Perth, Australia, she stayed at the Esplanade Hotel, whose chef, Herbert Sachse, is often credited with creating the dessert some six years later. Supposedly the pavlova acquired its name after someone proclaimed his dessert was "as light as pavlova." Others think the name stems from the fact that the ring-shaped meringue resembled pavlova's frilly, white costume in her most famous role, the Dying Swan. Pavlovas are traditionally filled with passion fruit.

 

WHERE? Finger Lakes Holiday Dinner

 ... Read more >

Comments (0)

What We're Reading: December 4, 2014

 

A cornucopia of Christmas cookies for all your upcoming holiday swaps. [HuffPo

 

From cigarettes to fresh produce: the nation’s largest food hub is set to open in Kentucky. [Civil Eats

 

Martin Riese is America’s only water sommelier, and he's created a 44-page water menu in Los Angeles. [Quartz

 

Relive your childhood and make Dunkaroos at home. [... Read more >

Comments (0)

A Taste of Tomorrow: the 1939 New York World's Fair

 

In honor of our role in Expo Milano 2015, we’re taking a look back at the history of food at world’s fairs. After her whirl through the 1893 Chicago Exposition, JBF assistant editor Maggie Borden is now taking us back to 1939, when the New York World’s Fair ran for six months in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, and where a young Mimi Sheraton delighted in new flavors and futuristic sights.

 

General Motor's Futurama Exhibit at the 1939 World's Fair

 

Taylor Pork Roll. That’s what acclaimed food, design, and travel writer Mimi Sheraton remembers from the 1939 New York World’s Fair. 

 

Initially conceived by local businessmen to raise the city (and the nation) out of the depths of the Great Depression, the fair was the first to... Read more >

Comments (0)

Eat Your Way Through Queens

 

When it comes to food, Queens is the unsung hero of New York City. Home to one million immigrants and hundreds of distinct cuisines, the borough is a treasure trove of under-the-radar ethnic eateries and beloved mom-and-pop shops. "Manhattan and Brooklyn get all the food glory, but when you're eating in Queens there's so much to choose from," says Andrea Lynn, Astoria resident and author of Queens, A Culinary Passport: Exploring Ethnic Cuisine in New York City's Most Diverse Borough. "Just in my neighborhood alone I can find Middle Eastern lamb tagine... Read more >

Comments (0)

What We're Reading: December 3, 2014

 

Are you a ziti, farfalle or rotelle? Discover your pasta personality. [Food & Wine]

 

75,000 square feet of ethnic grocery adventures is now a reality at the new Food Bazaar in Queens. [Gothamist]

 

Little critters with a big appetite: a new study shows that NYC insects eat more junk food than humans do. [TIME]

 

The USDA reports on a very berry revolution, with significantly increased consumption of berries in the past decade. [NYT]

 

Where does posting calories... Read more >

Comments (0)

Eye Candy: Togarashi-Seared Steelhead Trout with Pressed Cucumbers

Togarashi-Seared Steelhead Trout with Pressed Cucumbers

 

Set against the backdrop of the magnificent, snow-capped Teton Mountains, Jackson Hole, Wyoming, is a world-renowned destination for skiers and foodies alike. At a recent Beard House dinner this fall, a group of the area’s most talented chefs teamed up to design a stunning menu that showcased their favorite local ingredients. One shining example, served during the reception hour: togarashi-seared steelhead trout with grilled peaches and pluots; a bright and refreshing maple, yuzu, and jalapeño vinaigrette; and crunchy, pressed cucumbers. This vibrant canapé had diners clamoring for more—and mulling over the idea of a food-filled trip to Jackson Hole for a reprise of the region's rich flavors.

 

View this event's menu and details here. For upcoming Beard House din... Read more >

Comments (0)

Eat This Word: Geoduck

A geoduck, radish, and avocado canapé at the Beard House

 

WHAT? "These are the most bizarre-looking of all clams (and perhaps all foods)," James Peterson writes in Fish & Shellfish of the geoduck, which makes its home in the Pacific Northwest. Waverly Root wasn't much kinder, describing it as a "clam so fat that it cannot close its shell." The bigger specimens of the world's largest burrowing clam weigh as much as 20 pounds, live as long as 150 years, and their neck, or siphon, extends by as much as three feet. They resemble…er…something not polite to write here. But odd-looking as they are, the geoduck has many admirers, culinary and otherwise. "Geoduck meat is delicious," Alan Davidson writes in The Oxford Companion to Food. The siphon meat is stirred into chowders and used for sushi; the body is sautéed. Asians pay as much as $30 per pound to dine on them, according to William Dietrich in The Seattle Times, who also... Read more >

Comments (0)

What We're Reading: December 2, 2014

 

Check out these oyster pearls of wisdom. [FR

 

How a vegan butcher shop works. [Eater

 

Love Girl Scout cookies? You can now buy them online. [NYT

 

The internationally popular potato. [First We Feast

 

Up your pickle game with this secret ingredient. [Zester Daily

 

McDonald’s: now coming to a church near you? [... Read more >

Comments (0)

Pages