On the Menu: Wine Lovers' Dinner

Paul Kulik and Jesse BeckerPaul Kulik and Jesse Becker

At the Boiler Room in Omaha, Nebraska, executive chef Paul Kulik has earned raves for what Omaha World-Herald critic Nichole Aksamit described as “overwhelmingly delicious Old-World-technique-meets-new-American food.” For tonight's Beard House dinner, Kulik’s artisan-inspired cuisine will be matched with thoughtful wine pairings selected by master sommelier Jesse Becker. Take a look at the menu below, then click here for your reservation: Hors d’Oeuvre Pastrami and Marrow Sabayon on Brioche Shaved House Prosciutto Corned Beef Tongue with Puffed Crayfish and Ho

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Churros

sweet potato churrosWHAT? Spanish crullers. Long before Krispy Kreme, cafés and street vendors in Spain were dispensing pleasure in the form of churros, addictive, sugar-sprinkled rings or strips of fried dough. The Conquistadors introduced the pastries—with chewy interiors and crunchy crusts—to their American colonies, and from Mexico to Argentina, vendors with cauldrons of frying oil invaded the plazas and mercados, Today, almost every Latin American country claims credit for them. There must have been a Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup moment when the first churros fell into a cup of sweetened hot chocolate, thereby creating one of the most delicious breakfasts in the Spanish-speaking world, make that the entire world. WHERE? Paul Kulik's Beard House dinner WHEN?

Comments (0)

On the Menu: Boston Meets Provence

Boston Meets Provence Housed in the former setting of the storied Charles Street Jail, Clink is one joint to which serious diners would happily be sentenced. Executive chef Joseph Margate—an Eleven Madison Park alum—has developed a modern French approach to seasonal cooking that has made him one of Boston’s breakout culinary stars. At tonight's Beard House dinner, chef Margate will be joined by vintner Valérie Rousselle-Riboud for an evening of contemporary cuisine française and Provençal wines. If you're tempted by the menu below, click here to make your reservation. Hors d’Oeuvre Pickled Island Creek Oysters Grilled Quail with Rosemary and Boston Honey Blue Ledge Farm

Comments (0)

A Discussion of Pellegrino Artusi at the New School

Science in the Kitchen and the Art of Eating WellMention Escoffier at a dinner party and most people, even those who don’t count themselves among the food-obsessed, will likely know you are referring to the great French chef who streamlined the professional kitchen and codified French cuisine. But bring up the name Artusi and you’ll get stares. And yet Pellegrino Artusi and his influential cookbook La Scienza in Cucina e L’Arte di Mangiar Bene (Science in the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well) helped shape what has become the world’s favorite thing to eat: Italian food. Self-published in 1891, Artusi, as the book is commonly known, was groundbreaking in many ways. First, it was written in Italian, the newly official language of the new country that few Italians, except those in Tuscany whose dialect it was based on, spoke. Seco

Comments (0)

Eat this Word: Madeleine

madeleinesWHAT? Sweet seashells. These delicate, scallop-shaped cookies have a history that long predates Proust's memory stimulant. Culinaria France recounts what sounds like a legend to us, that the cookies first became popular back in the 18th-century, when the Duke of Lorraine, a consummate party host, found himself short a pastry chef while entertaining one night. With no time to spare, the Duke was forced to turn to his chambermaid Madeleine to create sweets for his guests. She whipped up her grandmother's airy, bite-sized cakes and, thus, the madeleine was born. Chances are her grandmother, if she existed, came from Commercy, the town whose bakers have been known for centuries throughout France for their delicate, hump-back madeleines. The batter is a simple mixture of eggs, sugar, and flour; it is a molded pan that gives madeleines their distinct appearance. When fresh from the oven, the cakey cookies have a moist and light interior and crisp outer layer

Comments (0)

On the Menu: March 27 through April 2

On the Menu
Here’s what’s happening at the Beard House and around the country next week:

Sunday, March 27, 6:oo P.M.
Sunday Supper at Chelsea Market
Lined with grocers and charming eateries, Chelsea Market is New York’s one-stop shop for every gourmand’s needs. Back by popular demand, this convivial Friends of James Beard Benefit will feature a diverse group of talented chefs who will gather under its roof to prepare the ultimate family-style meal.

Monday, March 28, 7:00 P.M.
Celebrity Chef Tour
The Celebrity Chef Tour began in 2004 as a way to bring the unique experience of dining at New York City’s historic James Beard House to cities around the country. At each Celebrity Chef Tour dinner, some of the nation’s top chefs come t... Read more >

Comments (0)


JBF Kitchen Cam