Eat this Word: Speck

SpeckWHAT? Mrs. Sprat's preferred bacon. Writing in The Food of Italy about the Italian Alps region, Waverly Root called speck "the ultimate in pork preparation." Its preparation, incidentally, can't be hurried. The meat is slowly smoked over several months for a few hours a day. "The theory is that if the smoking were done all at the same time," Root writes, "only the outer layer of meat would be really smoked, whereas the slower process smokes it through and through." Cold temperatures and high altitudes also contribute to the process. Speck yields large quantities of fat when rendered. The fat is occasionally poured over bread or used to fry potatoes, and the speck itself is often used as a garnish. WHERE? Wolfgang Ban and Eduard Frauneder's Beard House dinner WHEN?

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Eat-Q: School Lunch

school lunch We've arrived at day 3 of our school lunch trivia week. Think you got yesterday's question about sloppy joes right? You did if you answered D. The “sloppy joe” sandwich—made of ground beef, onions, and sweetened tomato sauce, served on a hamburger bun—is referred to as a “slushburger” in North Dakota, a “yip yip” in southwestern Illinois, and a “wimpy” in northeastern Pennsylvania. [poll id="6"]

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Jobs We Love: Cricket Azima

Cricket Azima Once a planner of political events, Cricket Azima combined her love of food with her passion for working with children and fashioned a career that fuses culinarian with kindergarten teacher. Find out more about the profession that always puts a "bounce in her step," even at the end of the day.

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Eat-Q: School Lunch

School lunchWelcome to our second installment of school lunch Eat-Q! Yesterday we asked you to guess who appeared on the first lunchbox. For those of you who picked A, you're correct! The first metal lunchbox, produced by the Aladdin Company in 1950, featured a decal of the cowboy hero Hopalong Cassidy. The sales were so huge that by 1954, the company was able to switch to lithography instead of using decals for the rest of their lunchboxes. To read more about the history of lunchboxes, click here. On to the next question! Check back tomorrow morning when we reveal the answer! [poll id="5"]

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Staff Recipe: Claudia's Vegetable Stir-Fry

Bok choyThis is one of my favorite quick dinners when I get home late from the office," says director of membership and house events Claudia Karach of this recipe that she adapted from Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Dugud’s Hot Sour Salty Sweet. “The modifications derived from my obsession with bok choy and the constant presence of cashews in my pantry.”

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Staff Recipe: Claudia's Vegetable Stir-Fry

Bok choyThis is one of my favorite quick dinners when I get home late from the office," says director of membership and house events Claudia Karach of this recipe that she adapted from Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Dugud’s Hot Sour Salty Sweet. “The modifications derived from my obsession with bok choy and the constant presence of cashews in my pantry.”

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Eat-Q: School Lunch

School lunch Fall is right around the corner, and you know what that means—the school  year has arrived, and with it the joys and perils of school lunch. Whether you brown bagged it or carried your milk money, everyone remembers the feelings of anticipation (and sometime dread) associated with the cafeteria. Even if you still haven't recovered from the trauma of eating that unidentifiable mush the lunch lady plopped on your tray every day, we hope you enjoy the school lunch trivia we're featuring this week. The first question is below—make your best guess, then check back tomorrow morning for the answer and a new question! [poll id="4"]

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